Love The Job You Hate: Yes, It's Possible!

by Roberta - 0 Comment(s)

Do you feel stuck in your job, or are you day dreaming about a big change? You aren’t alone. Recent research has shown that 44% of North American workers are unsatisfied with their jobs. But is quitting or being miserable your only option?

Happily, it’s not. Due to popular demand, we've invited back coaches Ann Nakaska and Sue Styles as they present a Central Library workshops on how to Love the Job You Hate on Saturday, September 21st. Discover the top reasons employees quit their jobs, and learn the three keys to embracing the job you have.

Here's what they've had to say about work and job dissatisfaction:

Sue, in your experience as a career consultant, what are the major factors for job dissatisfaction?

Sue: In my experience, the feelings of frustration due to inter-personal relationships have a huge impact. I have heard repeatedly that people will stay at a job they don't like because the people are so great and they have built relationships.

Sue, you recently authored a book entitled "How to Enjoy Your Work." Did anything in particular inspire you to write it?

Sue: I meet and talk with employees everyday who confess they don't care at all about their role at work. In my own progress through different jobs I discovered how to enjoy my work even though I didn't like my job. There is value if you can develop an ability to focus on it, and I wanted to share my insights and strategies with others, whether or not they wanted to stay in their current situation.

Ladies, what are the signs that it’s time to quit and move on?

Sue: Seth Godin writes a fabulous little pocketbook called The Dip which addresses this question exactly. I read several years ago and it really helped me gain some objectivity. When the eight hours of one’s day is spent complaining, being frustrated, even perhaps feeling nauseas and overly stressed then it's definitely time for change!

Ann: The major signpost I use is energy levels. When I am feeling burnt out and have tried a number of different ways to solve the work issues, it’s probably a sign to start looking. That being said, I believe everyone should be actively engaged in their career planning process all the time. When people are more engaged and proactive, they are less likely to find themselves in the position of being unhappy at work.

What is your top strategy for taking charge and making a positive change?

Sue: One of my favorite quotes is "Accept conditions as they are or accept responsibility for changing them, " coined by Dennis Waitley. The first thing is to acknowledge your current conditions and then be determined to move towards the conditions you desire. It all starts with a viable vision and then a plan followed by action.

Ann: My top strategy is to be a proactive career planner. Career decision making happens every day in little ways that most people are not even conscious of. I encourage people to become more aware of the career decisions they are making.

How much control does the employee have in creating a better work experience for themselves?

Ann: I believe that people have much more control than they think they do. What they often don't have is the information they need to create a better work experience. Also, I believe the feelings of lack of control often come from seeing ourselves as "the employee.” Instead, we need to realized that we are an integral part of industry and that employers, customers and shareholders need us just as much as we need them.

Sue: My initial response is the same as Ann's—more than you think! Depending on the role and company, you can be instrumental in developing yourself as well as your role. Most businesses are not looking to make employees miserable. They want staff to take ownership and submit ideas, and they want people who want to grow with the company.