Job & Career Accelerator—a new tool for job searchers

by Janice - 0 Comment(s)

We have long recommended our Learning Express database (found under the Business, Investment, Directories & Career section in our E-Library) to job searchers looking for online courses and information related to resumes, interviews, communication skills and professional examinations.

Through Learning Express, we now have a valuable new resource: the Job & Career Accelerator.

The Job & Career Accelerator is another source for occupational descriptions and has resume and cover letter builders, examples of excellent resumes and cover letters, and information about interviewing and online job applications:

We are especially thrilled that the Job & Career Accelerator also has video tutorials for many of the most popular basic computer programs, such as Microsoft Word, Excel, Powerpoint and Project and Adobe Illustrator:

If you want to learn more about the Job & Career Accelerator database, or any of our other career databases, contact us: 403-260-2782 or busn@calgarypubliclibrary.com/.

The T-Cover Letter Strikes Again

by Janice - 2 Comment(s)

Last week we blogged about the T-Cover Letter—a cover letter style that is enormously popular with hiring managers. Our Strategic Networking volunteer Debbie Mastel has forwarded us another example of how one of our customers used the T-Cover Letter format to successfully find work:

"The T Cover letter is the most effective cover letter I have come across in my entire professional career. It was introduced to me by Debbie in one of the strategic networking sessions I attended at the library. From the time I heard about it, it really did strike me and I know it was the correct formula I needed to grab employer attention. By that time I was around just 5 weeks in Canada and everything was new to me. I was quick enough to change my formats to T letter and also customize my resume to go with that.

Within a week I got an interview at a Big Oil & a Gas Company, and another one at a IT company. I almost got the Oil & Gas job, and the Hiring manager was complimentary of my cover letter. After about 2 weeks I got an interview at DeVry University and now I am working there.

I am glad to say I attended that networking session and met Debbie, where I learned all about the best secret in finding employment—the T cover letter. Thanks to it, I am now working in less than 12 weeks from moving to Canada. I think it’s a great tool and many people should start using it, it also helps you focus and identify your suitability to the job and helps you easily focus on applying for a specific job target rather than being too general."

Have you had success with the T-Cover Letter? We want to hear about it.
Click HERE to post your experiences in the comment box below.


See the previous blog post for more examples about the T-Cover Letter format: The T-Cover Letter.

For more information about our Strategic Networking program that runs on the Third Floor of the Central Library every Thursday evening from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. or other examples of cover letters or resumes contact us:

Central Library
Third Floor
403-260-2782
busn@calgarypubliclibrary.com

The T-Cover Letter

by Janice

Debbie MastelThe style and formatting of excellent resumes and cover letters can vary depending on geography and industry and change over time. The T-cover letter is a newer format that is tremendously popular with hiring manager and recruiters. Debbie Mastel, one of the library's Strategic Networking program volunteers, answered a few of our questions about the T-cover letter:

When should someone use a T cover letter?

DM: It doesn’t matter if you’re using transferable skills or an exact match to a posting, the T cover letter should always be used. If you don’t have a posting then you can do some research to figure out what you think the requirements for their organization would be. This can be done by getting old postings or postings from other companies. This style is also difficult when writing a cover letter in to an e-mail instead of an attachment so I recommend people have templates for the letter that can easily be used in either Word format or e-mails.

Do you prefer the format? Why?

DM: Yes, I do prefer the T cover letter format, as I believe it serves three main purposes:

  1. It assists the recruiter, especially if they’re junior and working on technical roles. It allows applicants to clarify acronyms, or similar systems they may have worked on.
  2. When a recruiter is using key words to score resumes. Because of volume, sometimes recruiters rely on systems to rate resumes. According to Right Management, 94% of the top 500 U.S. companies are now using computer programs to evaluate resumes. Canada is sure to follow suit.
  3. When you’re using transferable skills to obtain a position. Countless times I’ve received resumes from people clearly using transferable skills but I can’t make the connection. I remember a colleague of mine once getting the resume for a fellow who groomed ski hills and had mentioned she didn’t see him fitting anywhere. Luckily it was brought to her attention that he might be a fit for a Heavy Equipment Operator position. We ended up hiring him as that but other people aren’t so lucky.

Recruiters don’t have time to figure out where you fit, that’s your job. The t-letter cover letter makes you articulate why you are qualified for the role. This is what you’re asking for, this is what I have.

Would you suggest that any job hunter should use this format for their cover letters? Are there any instances in which you wouldn't prefer the T cover letter?

DM: The only time I can think of that this format may not work is for Academics or people that need to submit a CV instead of a resume. I’m not that familiar with this area but that’s the only example I can think of. I would welcome comments from others if they have reasons this cover letter wouldn’t work for them.

Can you give one or two anecdotal examples of people you've hired or Strategic Networking customers who have found that the T cover letter opened doors that may not have otherwise been opened?

DM: I asked some job searchers to share their feelings about the usefulness of the T-cover letter. Here is one response:

The reason I believe the two-column T cover letter worked well for me in the past was because it was significantly different than writing three or four paragraphs as in a standard cover letter.

The T cover letter was simple to use. First, I underscored the keywords or phrases in the job description’s requirements and qualifications sections that fit my background, experiences, and skill sets. Then, I filled out the position’s key requirements in the table’s left column and aligned them with my matching skill sets or experiences in the right column.

The concisely-worded bullet points in two column format immediately captured the hiring manager’s attention without him having to read longer paragraphs. My T cover letter intrigued and interested him. I was able to zero in on the value I could provide that related to the hiring manager's and position's needs, and, consequently, the hiring manager continued with reviewing my resume. In summary, the T cover letter helped me to (1) focus my reply, (2) save time, and (3) avoid responses to inappropriate job postings.”

March 19: Debbie sent another response from someone who had great success with the T-Cover Letter:

"The T Cover letter is the most effective cover letter I did come across in my entire professional career. It was introduced to me by Debbie in one of the networking meeting I attended. From the time I heard about it, it really did strike me and I know it was the correct formula I was looking for to grab employer attention. By that time I was around just 5 weeks in Canada and everything was new to me. I was quick enough to change my formats to T letter and also customize my resume to go with that.

Within a week I got an interview at a Big Oil & a Gas Company, and another one at a IT company. I almost got the Oil & Gas job, and the Hiring manager was complimentary of my cover letter. After about 2 weeks I got an interview at DeVry University and now I am working there,.

I am glad to say I attended that networking meeting and met Debbie, where I learned all about the best secret in finding employment—the T cover letter. Thanks to it, I am now working in less than 12 weeks from moving to Canada. I think it’s a great tool and many people should start using it, it also helps you focus and identify your suitability to the job and helps you easily focus on target than be general in applying. Thanks Debbie.”

For more information about the T-cover letter:

A template of the T-cover letter: Workopolis Sample of the T-style cover letter.

Thoughts from another recruiter on the T-cover letter: The "T" Cover Letter—The Only Type Worth Sending.


Debbie Mastel volunteers with the enormously popular Strategic Networking program that runs on the Third Floor of the Central Library every Thursday evening from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. Debbie is a Critical Talent Specialist with Devon Energy Corporation in Calgary.

Hot Off the Press: New Career Books for November

by Julia Brewster - 0 Comment(s)

Your First Year as a Nurse: Making the Transition from Total Novice to Successful Professional by Donna Cardillo

New to this revised is discussion of professional issues related to standards of care and nursing ethics, job-hunting challenges and solutions for handling quandries such as delayed career start and nontraditional practice.

Zen and the Art of Making a Living by Laurence G. Boldt

This book goes beyond inspiration, providing a proven formula for bringing creativity, dignity, and meaning to every aspect of the work experience.

Knock 'em Dead Cover Letters by Martin Yate

Highlights four types of cover letters and how to write each one.

Knock 'em Dead 2011: The Ultimate Job Search Guide 25th Anniversary Edition, by Martin Yate

The classic guide to job searching now includes new information on where to find jobs, how to pinpoint which job openings offer the best chance of success, and what answers to interview questions will most impress interviewers.

Law School Essays That Made a Difference by Eric Owens

Contains 70 real application essays as well as interviews with admissions pros and with students who've been through the process and made it to law school.

Making a Living in Your Local Music Market: Realizing Your Marketing Potential by DickWeissman

Describes types of music work and discusses starting a band, making demos, finding and booking work, becoming versatile, understanding musicians unions and other organizations and producing a record.