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The Heritage Triangle

by Christine Hayes - 0 Comment(s)

Heritage Triangle

Part of the reason we are so happy to be staying in the East Village is that we will still be smack dab in the middle of a very important group of heritage partners. Some years ago we formalized our association with our near neighbours and history colleagues, the City of Calgary Archives and the Glenbow Museum, Library and Archives. We call ourselves the Heritage Triangle, because within the radius of a couple of blocks there sit three very valuable repositories of information for researchers. (Once we move, the triangle may need to be renamed – maybe we’ll become the Heritage Line or the Heritage Ellipse) In the few years we have been actively collaborating, our affiliation has been very productive. We never hesitate to take advantage of our partners, in the best way of course. Each of us has wonderful and unique stuff and while we may covet just a little, we have also gotten to know the people and the collections so well that we know where to send researchers if we don’t have what they need. This is a very efficient and effective way to operate and it provides a very good service to our customers.

Each of the organizations involved in the triangle has its own different and interesting stuff. Among the Glenbow’s many strengths are an amazing collection of personal papers from individuals and families in Calgary and area, extensive data on Metis genealogy and an unrivalled collection of historic photographs of Calgary and Southern Alberta. They also have an outstanding map collection as well as directories from many different locales. You can visit the Glenbow site and see some of what they have to offer at www.glenbow.org.

Next door to us is the City of Calgary Archives (officially, the City of Calgary, Corporate Records, Archives.) Their mandate is to acquire, preserve and protect civic documents. Civic documents are the papers of people and departments of the City and its predecessors and organizations and individuals that have a close affiliation with the City. These can be of great value to researchers as they are the primary source materials for the administrative history of the city. The strengths of the City Archives collection include records relating to building research, such as records of tax assessments; records of official representatives of the municipal government such as mayors and aldermen/councilors and a whole swack of documents relating to the Calgary Winter Olympics. You can find the City of Calgary, Corporate Records, Archives online by going to the new, user friendly City of Calgary website (www.calgary.ca) and searching for Archives.

We here at Calgary Public Library are the last (but not least) leg of the Heritage Triangle. We have a wonderful collection of material in our Community Heritage and Family History Collection that is just waiting for you to explore. There is great material for historic research in other departments as well, such as our government documents collection on the 3rd floor. Some of the items in our collection are a complete run of Calgary Henderson’s Directories and telephone directories, an extensive collection of local histories of Southern Alberta towns, historic newspapers, a complete collection of Canadian Census on microfilm as well as three great photograph collections, available online through our website. We also have a great staff who are always available to help you – and I can say that for our partners as well, having worked with them as a colleague and as a researcher.

You can see the Heritage Triangle brochure through the link right next to this posting or by going to http://tinyurl.com/3b4soch Do come down and visit us – ignore the construction – we would be delighted to see you.

8th Avenue SE

Alison Jackson Photograph Collection, AJ 1331

Stephen Avenue

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