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Hospitals in Calgary

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

Mountview home for girls

Mountview Home For Girls, 1958

From The Calgary Herald, March 8, 1958

I was doing a bit of research for a customer on a hospital in Calgary that I had no idea had existed. A little digging turned up the bit of information the customer needed, but in the process I discovered a whole whack of hospitals that had existed in Calgary that I had not heard of. The big hospitals are well documented; we have tons of information on the General and the Holy Cross as well as the newer hospitals such as the Foothills and the Lougheed. But what I didn’t realize was that there were smaller hospitals and hospital units scattered throughout the city.

I suppose it’s a bit of a cliché to say that things were different at the turn of the 20th century, but sometimes I’m not sure I realize just how different. I am sometimes shocked as I go through early newspapers at the things I find.

One that I find particularly unsettling is the advertising of children for adoption – I still can’t wrap my head around that one. The other is the prevalence of disease. I suppose we know, intellectually, that the city would not have been a clean place, that there were no antibiotics and that water wasn’t always clean. In many cases, the response to illness was to isolate the infectious person – that was the case with smallpox, tuberculosis and typhoid, for example. As late as 1912, hospitals had to turn away people with contagious diseases, as there wasn’t sufficient isolation space for them.

The hospital I was looking at was built in response to the need for more isolation units. The land was purchased in 1913 with plans to build a smallpox isolation hospital and a typhoid and/or tuberculosis hospital. The Mount View Hospital and its neighbour, the smallpox hospital, were built on 16th Avenue NE in 1914. Shortly after it opened, a fire broke out in the linen room. The intrepid “lady superintendent” immediately responded, only to have the fire pump break. Not to be so easily defeated, she organized a bucket brigade and had the flames doused by the time the firemen arrived.

By 1916 Mount View was housing returned soldiers who were suffering from TB. There was a bit of a scandal in 1917 when the number of eggs given to the patients was cut back. Apparently the treatment for TB was as much milk and eggs (often raw) that a patient could hold. The reduction provoked an outcry and sparked some very interesting letters to the editor. To get to the nub of the matter, the Calgary Daily Herald launched an investigation and found that the treatment of patients in the hospital was up to and even surpassed treatment in other sanitaria. The patients were fed very well, but since more recent research had proved that an unlimited diet of milk and eggs was not necessarily the best, the cut to the diet was reasonable. The reporter also found that several patients were being accommodated on the newly built porch (this was November, and part of the treatment for TB was exposure to cold, fresh air) and others were accommodated in tents on the site. There were also three padded rooms in the basement for “mentally deranged” patients. (CDH Nov 3 1917, p12)

By the 20s Mount View had become a home for delinquent girls, run by the United Church. I'm not sure what constituted delinquency, but the home stayed open until 1958.

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