Latest Posts

Off Line

The Heritage Triangle PDF link

Heritage Roundtable: Century Homes

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

Cliff Bungalow by Bill Longstaff

Cliff Bungalow School

Photo by Bill Longstaff

The next Heritage Round Table is on Thursday at the Cliff Bungalow–Mission Community Association. In keeping with our Century Homes theme, we will be hearing presentations on how to identify the style of your home from David Monteyne of the U of C Faculty of Environmental Design, how to photograph your century home from photographer James McMenamin and historic paint colours and sampling with heritage consultant Laura Pasacreta. If you have a picture of your home, you can bring it along for a “What style is it?” consultation with the experts.

The Cliff Bungalow-Mission Community Association is at 2201 Cliff Street SW in the historic Cliff Bungalow School. The program is on June 21 from 7:00-9:00 p.m. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. and there will be refreshments, of course. You can find out more on the Century Homes website www.centuryhomes.org

I think just the opportunity to see this beautiful old school would be reason enough to come, but the speakers will be the icing on the cake.

This is proving to be a very popular program and it is filling up fast. Get you registration in today, if you’d like to hear these great presentations.

Century Home

A Beautiful Century Home as Photographed by James McMenamin

UPDATE:

The Round Table was a roaring success. Over 100 people attended. Here is what happened, thanks to our summer library student, Melissa:

On Thursday, June 21, Calgary Public Librariy was pleased to attend the Heritage Round Table hosted by Calgary Heritage at the Cliff Bungalow–Mission Community Association.

David Monteyne, Associate Professor at the University of Calgary Faculty of Environmental Design, began the evening with a presentation about various residential architectural styles from Calgary’s early boom. The two-story home in the photograph below is one example of the homes that would have been available for purchase a century ago from the Sear’s Modern Homes Mail Order Catalogue. This architectural splendor would have sold for only $1277!

Bungalow Plan Sears Catalogue

Modern Home No. c187, The Sherbourne, from the Sears Modern Homes Mail Order Catalog 1913 to 1922

Professor Monteyne also concluded the evening with a “What style is it?” consultation for those attendees who brought along pictures of their century homes to help them identify the style of their homes.

Following Professor Monteyne’s presentation on architectural style, architectural photographer James McMenamin discussed how to photograph century homes. While this was less of a technical demonstration, McMenamin provided helpful hints on lighting considerations, on selecting photographic angles, and on how to position objects in architectural photographs. Some helpful hints include: 1) If there are objects, such as a tree or a flag pole in your yard, be sure to include the entire object; and 2) Try to take pictures of your home in soft lights rather than hard lights, such as the sun, which create dark shadows. Examples of McMenamin’s photography can be viewed at: http://www.jamesmcmenamin.com/.

The presentations for the Round Table concluded with Heritage Consultant and Historic Archaeologist at Donald Luxton, Laura Pasacreta, who discussed historic paint colours and paint sampling of century homes. If you have a century home and you are interested in having your paint sampled to establish its original colour, contact Ms. Pasacreta at laura@donaldluxton.com.

For more information on the Century Homes project, visit http://centuryhomes.ca, or follow them on twitter @CenturyHomesYYC or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/CenturyHomesCalgary

Essential Skills for Successful Genealogists

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

PC 1649

New Settlers, Their First House, Western Canada

Postcards from the Past, PC 1649

I read an interesting blog posting this week which outlines some of the skills that a successful genealogist will need to develop. Some of these are quite straightforward, things we probably learned in kindergarten, such as, be polite, be a good listener, be patient. Others might not be so obvious, or may be so obvious as to be overlooked. Here is the list, adapted from Bob Brooke at the Genealogy Today blog.

Have a plan: I speak from experience here; you need to have a plan. While certain advertisements and television programs suggest that you really don’t need to know what you are looking for, you really do and having a plan of attack will save you much grief in the long run. It also pays to plan how you will organize the information you collect long before you have too much information to organize. You don’t want this to happen:

Messy desk

Question authority (well, sort of.) In my wild and misspent youth, I had this as a bumper sticker. I’ve adapted it a little for genealogy. What it means is that everyone makes mistakes, even the people who record our data. It helps to know why the document was produced and who provided the information. You know that the person listed on a death certificate did not provide the information to the officials, so who did? Generally, it is best to verify every fact with at least one other document (two documents if the information comes from your family membersJ)

Listen: Learn to listen, not just to family members, who, even if they are not always the most accurate, often have great stories that may provide clues to investigate, but also listen to other genealogists. I have learned far more from the coaches in our Family History Coaching program, from other members of the genealogical society and from customers in the library that I will ever learn from classes. This is why I can highly recommend our Family History Coaching program. We are getting more and more genealogists who are coming to the program simply to work on their research while there are others working on the same thing so that there can be collaboration and information exchange. Many hands make light work (to quote my Nana)

Learn how to ask questions: This skill will arise from your planning skills. Knowing what you are looking for makes it easier to articulate a question. And, yes, you can ask questions. Librarians, archivists, genealogy societies, local history associations, message boards, all invite questions from genealogists. But, it is far easier to answer the question “do you have a transcription for the cemetery in which I think my ancestor is buried and could you look him up?” than “what do you have on Joe Blow?” or “send me everything you have on Joe Blow.”

Learn about the records: It can save you a lot of pain if you learn about the records for the area in which you are researching. Find out what is available, where they are held, how to you access them etc. Don’t waste your time looking for a birth certificate in a place or a time in which births weren’t registered. This also leads to another pointer: learn as much as you can about the place where your ancestors lived. Knowing the history, social customs, religious beliefs etc can lead you to any number of records that may exist. It can also give you insight in to the way your ancestors lived and, perhaps, how they thought. This can also provide clues.

Be patient: Genealogy is not something that can be done in the week before your family reunion. Finding records takes time, getting the records takes time, verifying the records takes time. Pursue this as a long term research project and you will get years and years of enjoyment from it.

Cite your sources: Learn how to take notes and how to properly cite a source. In the long run this will save you endless hours of frustration when you need to go back to find the source again (and believe me, you will) I have known people who have come in with a photocopy of a page of a book asking if we recognize it. Sometimes we do, sometimes we don’t. If you are planning on publishing, you can consult a manual on how to cite sources in genealogy such as Evidence: Citation and Analysis for the Family Historian by Elizabeth Shown Mills). If you are planning on keeping records for the family, the citation may not need to be as detailed, but you should give a basic citation that will allow you or anyone following in your footsteps, to find the record again. .This is usually the title, the author, if there is one, the volume number, the page number, the date it was published. For microfilm you can record the reel number and the name of the repository (each archive and library uses a different numbering structure). Actually, it probably wouldn’t hurt to read Evidence even if you’re not publishing.

Keep an open mind: This applies in many different instances. Keep your mind open to other resources, follow any leads, no matter how thin they may seem and please, please, keep in mind that just because you spell your name one way, doesn’t mean your ancestors didn’t spell it differently or that is wasn’t butchered by a census taker, a transcriber, a government official or anyone else.


So that was my lecture. I’m sure there are lots of other pointers, but in my long career as a genealogy-helper, these are the ones I wish I had followed (especially the organization one – that isn’t my desk in the photo above, but mine is just as bad)

So Happy Hunting and remember, the librarian is your friend.

Librarian

The Cowtown Dilemma

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

PC 1394

Cows on the Bow River, Calgary 1903

Postcards from the Past, pc 1394

I was cruising through the newspapers, looking for something genealogical or locally historical to talk about in the blog. I thought I’d hit something when I read an ad for cholera medication. On second thought that seemed a bit grim for the beginning of summer, so my next idea was to see what was going on in the city in 1912 but Harry the Historian has that covered, so that one was out. Then I decided to take the advice of a historian who I admire and look at what was happening in Calgary in 1913 – the year after the big boom. And I found this in the Calgary Daily Herald’s Query Column on January 2.

Question 777: Kindly inform me if there is any bylaw prohibiting people from letting their ducks and hens come on your lawn. I live right in the centre of Calgary and my neighbour’s hens come along the walk…and when the door is open they go into the house. Can you kill the hens…?

Ans. A person who keeps fowls in the city is obliged to keep them shut in. …You are not allowed to kill them. You should keep your door shut.

It was forty years later that poultry farming was made illegal within the city limits. I’ve written before about my sister’s “farm” – I spent a lovely week out there helping her build a bird coop so her chickens, pheasants and, particularly, the peacock (I know, but it is Vancouver Island!) wouldn’t go into the neighbour’s yard. Now, granted, a peacock isn’t everyone’s idea of livestock, but she does live in a rural area , so having wandering animals is not unusual. But Calgary is now a major urban centre with a population of over 1 million, very far from our rural roots.

However, I am constantly reminded that we are not so far from those roots as we may think. I still remember farm houses sprinkled through the neighbourhoods at the west edge of the city when I was growing up. The Pony Palace riding stables were out there within smelling distance. And there were farms just over the rise where Christie Estates now stands. If I faced west, I could see horses grazing on the hill, when I turned east, I could see the towers and office buildings in the downtown core. This is the very nature of Calgary. I remember reading an article in which the writer proposed that instead of the white cowboy hat, we could be wearing oil derricks on our heads. It is a valid point.

The Stampede turns 100 this year. Even at its start, the Stampede was a celebration of a way of life that was passing. It was supposed to be a one-time event, so the space for the Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth was leased from the Calgary Industrial Exhibition. In 1923 the Exhibition would merge with the Stampede to become The Calgary Exhibition and Stampede, thus uniting the rural past with the industrial present. We have always had our feet in two worlds and this may be what gives us our unique character. I am planning on whooping it up big time during this special Stampede week, maybe even while wearing an oil derrick, a la Flare Square, on my head.

Chickens

D-Day: The Battle for Normandy - A Program

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

 

They must not go alone

into that burning building! – which today

is all of Europe!

 

(from Poem and Prayer for an Invading Army by Edna St Vincent Millay)

 

The dangers confronted by Canadian soldiers on June 6, 1944 are unfathomable to anyone who didn’t live through those times or fight those battles. For the most part we know war stories through the dramatization of film, through school lessons blurred by time, or the reluctant reminiscence of veterans. Unless you are a devout student of history you may not often get the chance to be the audience of empassioned, highly-informative presentations on subjects that continue to shape our lives, even 68 years later.

On Wednesday, June 6, the library offers such an opportunity as we host “D-Day: The Battle of Normandy”, presented by a military historian known to leave audiences dazzled and enlightened - Stephane Guevremont. Bringing the gems of his research to life, along with many of the actual artefacts in the form of rare film footage, photography, enlistment documentation or machinery maintenance reports, Guevremont’s presentations are guaranteed to engage you with history in a refreshing light.

Don’t miss Guevremont’s presentation on Canada’s critical contribution to the success of D-Day. The details:

 

Wednesday, June 6
7 - 9 p.m.
2nd floor, John Dutton Theatre
Central Library

Register in person, by calling 403-260-2620 or online.

 

Century Homes - A Guide to the Resources

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

PC 1402

Unidentified House in Calgary, ca 1910

Postcards from the Past, PC 1402

I have to mention it again, but I swear it will be the last time (for a while): 1912 was a very big year in this city. And despite our reputation as a city of demolition, there are still a good number of buildings still standing from that period. Your home may be one of them. I have posted before about the Century Homes project. We have held two very successful workshops, as part of this project, to introduce owners of homes that are 100 years or so old, to the resources available at the various libraries and archives. I thought I would put this list on the blog, so that anyone who is interested in doing this research can do so.

Calgary Public Library has the following resources – most are in our local history room on the 4th floor of the Central Library

  • Henderson’s Directories (early years also available at http://peel/library.ualberta.ca/bibliography/2961.html )
  • Maps
  • Lists of voters
  • Census records
  • Photographs (through the CHFH Digital Library http://cdm16114.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/)
  • Newspapers (clippings, digital, microfilm)
  • General Histories
  • Community Histories
  • Building Inventories
  • Architectural histories
  • Community Profiles
  • Plan Books
  • Catalogues (to see what the interiors might have looked like)
  • Promotional material

City of Calgary, Corporate Records, Archives has the following:

  • Historical assessment information
  • Building permits
  • Some photos and plans
  • Annexation information
  • Records from towns and villages (Bowness, Forest Lawn, Montgomery, Crescent Heights) that became part of the City

Glenbow Museum, Library and Archives has these resources:

  • Directories
  • Fire Insurance Maps
  • Photograph collection
  • Selected Architectural plans
  • Personal Papers
  • Selected community information

(Update: Some fire insurance plans have been digitized by Library and Archives Canada and can be found by accessing their website: http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/lac-bac/search/all and using the search term "fire insurance plan" <include the quotation marks> and the name of the location for which you are searching. )

These resources (and the outstanding staff at all of these repositories) are available to you to assist in your house research. You may want to check out the history of your house even if it is a relative “baby” in the city. You never know what you may find! There are links on the right side of the page to the Heritage Triangle brochure, which outlines the collection strengths of the three libraries/museums/archives above as well as a guide to doing building history in Calgary. This kind of research can turn up all kinds of interesting information. Come and talk to us if you’d like to get started.

PC 52

13th Avenue, Looking East

Postcards from the Past, PC 52

Ancestry Tips and Tricks

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

Ancestry screen shot

Screen shot of Ancestry LE showing drop-down menu

Ancestry.com has just announced that it now has over ten billion records in its database. Wow! It wasn't all that long ago that I looked at the database and decided it didn't have enough Canadian or international content to make it worthwhile. Things change very quickly. Now I can’t imagine how we would function without our Ancestry LE subscription.

Of course, finding something in a database with 10 billion records can be something of a challenge. I liken it to being dropped in the National Library with the notion that somewhere there is a book with information about my family in it. Now go find it. Yikes, this could take a while.

There are a couple of fundamental strategies for finding information in a gargantuan collection such as this. The first thing I always recommend is for new users to look at either the Card Catalogue (you can find that by hovering over “Search” or clicking on the arrow beside “Search” on the front page of Ancestry LE) or by checking the locale where you are searching (you find the interactive map by clicking on “Search”). That way you can find out what records exist for the area you are searching. It pays to know what is in a database before you start searching. For example, if you are looking for a birth registration for someone in Alberta, you’d probably like to know that those records are not in Ancestry before you spend valuable time looking for them.

The next tip is to search one record set at a time. If you fire your name into the general search, you could turn up thousands of records, many of which are not relevant to you. By using the card catalogue to narrow the search down, you know that your results will be more likely to be relevant. Of course, this method requires that we know what we are looking for, which is one of the first rules of genealogy. It is always easier to find what you are looking for if you know what you are looking for (no matter what the advertising and “Who do you think you are?” say to the contrary.) If your search is for “grandmother’s birth record,” you have a better chance of success than if your search is for “everything about grandmother.”

Keep in mind, as well, that Ancestry LE has a great learning centre that can be accessed by clicking on “Help” in the upper right hand corner. There is a Wiki and an Answers section that can both be searched by keyword. It is a great resource to check if you are just starting out, or if you have encountered something in a record that you can’t figure out.

So, with those pointers in mind, visit us at any branch of the Calgary Public Library to try out Ancestry LE. You can access it with your library card number and PIN in any of our 18 branches. We've come a long way, from dusty originals to digitized records.

Ancestry LE interactive ma

Screen shot of Ancestry LE showing interactive map and tabs

The Times they are a Changin'

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

Library and Archives Canada

Genealogists and local historians are people who love heritage – that is an obvious statement, I think. Genealogists and local historians are also people who understand the value of heritage and of the documents and artifacts that constitute that heritage. Here at the Calgary Public Library we put requests in for documents that are sometimes arcane, sometimes bizarre, but always valuable in the pursuit of our history. We often request these items from our national “memory keeper” Library and Archives Canada.

Changes are taking place at Library and Archives Canada, though, and they may have an effect on how we are able to access those documents that are so important to our research. Proposals for trimming the budget include reducing hours of service in the Library and Archives itself and ending LAC’s role in the national interlibrary loan program. There are also changes being made to what LAC will acquire and hold and who will be responsible for protecting the documents in the care of the national repository. These changes may have far reaching effects on those of us who rely on our national library to have and hold the literary output of our country.

Anyone who works in a library and most of you who use our library are aware that the way libraries do what they do will have to change. Library and Archives Canada has been noticing a decrease in in-person visits, with a corresponding upsurge in the use of their website. And, to be fair, the changes proposed for Library and Archives Canada do include the potential for increased digitization of the holdings that are most accessed. What scares many of us genealogists is that we remember what happened with the last technological advance in document management, the evil microfilm. While we are glad that we have it (it is virtually indestructible) we are leery of what happens with the originals once the copy is made. In the case of census records and passenger lists, once the microfilming was completed, the originals were destroyed. For most of the collection that is fine but there are several dozen reels that are filmed very badly, are basically unreadable, and we have no recourse to the original. Now, I understand why destroying the census originals seemed like a good idea at the time. The books were large and hard to store, old paper requires special care and a special environment. Getting rid of these things might have seemed like a great cost-cutting measure. I’m not sure it was.

These changes are going to have effects in the future that we can’t even begin to foresee. While changes do need to be made in all libraries we need to consider the LAC as a special case. They are not just any other library and their role as the collector and protector of the country’s documentary heritage needs to be recognized as a pillar on which we can build the future. We will never maintain the greatness of this country by dismantling the past.

If you are interested in developments at Library and Archives Canada, you can visit our E-Library under Newspapers and read the papers in Newspaper Direct Press Display. You can read up on the cuts in a number of Canadian newspapers by entering a search in the text box at the top of the page.

Attestation Paper from LAC

World War I Attestation Paper from Library and Archives Canada Collection

Inspiring Life Stories

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

Inspiring Life Stories

I know you’re probably tired of my rambling on and on about our 100th birthday, but I am sooooo excited (and I just can’t hide it). So many cool things will be going on connected with our birthday that we are guaranteed to have the best year yet. And the event that I was most excited about will be happening on May 17 when our own history book Calgary Public Library: Inspiring Life Stories since 1912 will be publically launched. Because it is a book about our history and I work in the history area of the library, my colleagues and I were involved (in varying degrees) in some of the research for this book. And we were privileged to have the author, Brian Brennan, working in our local history area.

You may think that a book about the history of a library may not exactly be your cup of tea, but when you think about it, the library is central to the life of a community. It is a meeting place, a place where you can come to learn, to have fun, to just hang out. That is what a good library should strive to be. And I think we are a great library. The story of the library is the story of our city, it is our story, so please join us on May 17 at the place where it all began, the magnificent Memorial Park Library (Click here for a link to the information about the program) . You will be able to buy a copy of the book and have it signed by the author. Or you can purchase the book on www.goodread.ca - Your Library Store. All proceeds from the sale of the book support the Calgary Public Library Foundation.

As I mentioned, the book launch is only one of a huge number of programs that will be offered to celebrate our 100th. You can check out what is going on at the Celebrate our Centennial cpl100.ca section of our website. There will be birthday parties, the Annie Davidson Lecture Series, Community Gardens and on and on. You can also check out our archive photographs in “Our Story in Pictures” also available at the cpl100.ca site. It is going to be a great year – please come and be a part of it.

CPL 103-22-01Our Stories in Pictures, cpl 103-22-01

It's Jane's Walk Time Again!

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

AJ 63-09

House of Jacob, 1962

Alison Jackson Photograph Collection, AJ 63-09

Spring must be coming because it is Jane’s Walk season again. This has become an annual event, and for any of you who have not heard of the Jane's Walks, well, let me fill you in. Jane's Walks are named in honour of Jane Jacob's who was an extremely influential thinker who advocated a community approach to city building. As part of this legacy, the Walks are held every year in many major cities. These tours are led by volunteers who talk about their communities. Last year we had a number of excellent neighbourhood tours, and this year, the momentum continues to grow and we have a choice of some extremely interesting topics and areas.

One that I am particularly looking forward to is Harry Sanders’ tour of Jewish Calgary on Sunday May 6. It will start at the Central Library and meander up to Memorial Park Library and back. Harry will point out historic and modern buildings, sites of demolished buildings, parks and institutions that have a link to the Jewish community in Calgary’s past. This is going to be great. Harry has a great knowledge of Calgary’s history and a brain packed with fascinating details. I never fail to learn from him and his talks are always entertaining. He and Marje Wing, the Customer Service Manager of the Alexander Calhoun Library, will also be conducting a walk through Marda Loop, starting at the Calhoun library on Saturday.

Calgary Public Library is connected to some other walks as well. Two of our staff members will be taking interested “Jane’s Walkers” on an Art Circuit tour of the City of Calgary’s art collection. This tour also starts at the Central Library and will proceed from there through the Plus 15 system. That tour will take place on Saturday May 5.

For a look at a “newer” area, Ann Lidgren, the Customer Service Manager of Nose Hill Library, will be exploring the Brentwood area around her branch and talking about the impact that a library branch can have in developing a community.

There will also be a tour starting out at the Louise Riley Library that will explore the history and homes of the surrounding area. This tour is led by Professor Graham Livesay.

This is just a hint at some of the walks that will be taking place. The subjects range far and wide, just like this vibrant city. You can find out about the East Village (with Clayton Buck), you can visit the Drop In Centre and see the wonderful work they are doing there, you can check out the bridges of the Mission area with Marilyn Williams or look out at the city from Crescent Road with Judith Umbach and her co-presenters. Our new Poet Laureate, Kris Demeanor, is even involved, giving us his view of the Bridgeland area. The list goes on and on. You have to check out the website (http://janeswalk.net/cities/landing/category/calgary/) and the huge variety of walks available. The chance to have an insider’s look at the various communities is a great way to get to know about our home. The walks and talks are always interesting and this year’s selection is the best yet.

PC 1278

Mission Bridge, ca 1936 (from postmark)

Postcards from the Past, PC 1278

Vimy Ridge

by Christine H - 0 Comment(s)

PC 1478

IODE War Memorial, Central Park

Postcards from the Past, PC 1478

Last week we celebrated the 95th anniversary of Vimy Ridge. It is said that the Canadian action at Vimy was the turning point for Canada. Before Vimy we were a frozen outpost of the British Empire, after Vimy we were a nation. That bit of information is certainly crucial to an understanding of Canada’s role in the Great War . But I am a bit of a micro-historian myself. I believe that we can also come to an understanding of the impact of world events by understanding the role of individuals in those events. This ties in nicely with my interest in genealogy, but it has also served me well in a new role I have taken on. Library and Archives Canada have a project called Lest We Forget, which involves collaboration with libraries around the country. The goal of this program is to bring the lives of Canadian soldiers to students in high schools by exposing them to primary source documents, in this case, the service records of men and women from their geographic area. I was a little leery of this to begin with. I love working with primary sources but I’m not sure if that is a sign of some dysfunction or if there might be others out there who get the same thrill from dusty old papers. Well, the students we have come in contact with seem to have the same feeling about micro-history and primary source materials that I do. Who knew? So now with this affirmation in hand, I am spreading the word about primary source research and Canada’s military history.

All of this leads me to Private Thomas Lawless. One thing that was really driven home by my involvement in Lest We Forget is the absolute horror of the battlefield. Photos of no-man’s land show a churned up, muddy pit of horse carcasses and dead bodies. It was, to belabor an obvious point, a chaotic nightmare where the niceties of tradition could not be observed. Bodies sometimes had to be left where they fell. Thomas Lawless was one of these soldiers who were left behind. As a matter of fact, his body was not discovered until 2003, and therefore he was still on the missing list until 2011, when scientists were finally able to confirm his identity. Thomas was from Ireland, but lived in Calgary when he enlisted, on November 22, 1915. He was 27, had sandy hair and a fresh complexion. He arrived in England in June of 1916 on the Olympia, but seems to have immediately contracted tonsillitis, which seemed to be a chronic problem for him, and was admitted to hospital. He ran a fever for a short while but by July he was fit enough to rejoin his regiment. After he died, his next of kin, listed as Mrs.K. Johnstone of 8th Street West, Calgary, received $275.46 of his back pay. His brother in Ireland received his medals.

How do I know all of this about Thomas? His service records have been digitized and made available by Library and Archives Canada. You can access the Soldiers of the First World War database here: http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/cef/001042-100.01-e.php

As the files that we are using in the Lest We Forget project are scanned, they are also put in this database. So while some records only include the attestation papers (but you can order the files if you want to see them) some include the entire service record. If you are researching an ancestor, or have seen a name on a cenotaph that you would like to pursue more information about, check out the Soldiers of the First World War database.

And just on a more personal note, some of the students from one of the schools in the Lest We Forget project are in France and were a part of the celebrations at Vimy. They are also going to visit the battlefields. They all carry their soldier’s story with them and I’m certain they will see the Great War through new/old eyes.

Attestation Paper LAC


Attestation paper of Thomas Lawless

Soldiers of the First World War database, Library and Archives Canada

891011121314151617Showing 121 - 130 of 310 Record(s)