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Christmas at the Grand Union Hotel

by Christine L Hayes - 0 Comment(s)

PC 696

The Grand Union Hotel, designed by noted architect William Dodd, was built in 1905 on Atlantic Avenue (or Whisky Row, as it was affectionately known). It was operated by A. Moodie, who also owned the Royal Hotel. The horse-drawn bus, seen in the picture, ferried travellers to and from the train station, four blocks away. The balconies could be seen from the station and offered views of the activity along Atlantic Avenue as well as views of the mountains. In 1906, just a year after it opened, it offered a sumptuous menu for Christmas dinner. The menu included familiar favourites such as creamed potatoes, corn on the cob, mince pie and French fries. It also included the more sophisticated fare:

Canape of Caviar, Clear Green Turtle Soup, Cream of Oysters

Planked White Fish de Hanover Sauce

Sweet Breads Braized [sic] a la Rothchild

Domestic Duck with Boston Clam Dressing

Saddle of Venison, Black Currant Jelly

Lobster Salad au Cresson

For dessert you could choose between Plum Pudding with Brandy sauce, three kinds of pie and pineapple trifle, ice cream, Oka cheese and jelly.

The Local History Collection in the Central Library includes many menus from Calgary establishments. You can find them in the library catalogue by typing the name of the establishment and the word 'menu' in the search box on the Calgary Public Library homepage (http://calgarypubliclibrary.com/)

Grand Union Menu coverMenu

Merry Christmas

by Christine L Hayes - 0 Comment(s)

PC 152

Carnegie Library, Calgary, Alberta, ca. 1912

Postcards from the Past, PC 152

Anyone who has read this blog knows about the very cool postcard collection that we have here in the Local History room. Many images on the blog are pulled from that collection, which can be viewed from the Community Heritage and Family History site by clicking on the link Postcards from the Past on the left side of the page. In that collection are quite a number of Christmas postcards – generally consisting of a vignette of a building or a scene from Calgary in an embossed card with a Christmas greeting in red around the picture. The card in this entry is a view of what is now Memorial Park Library.

These cards mostly date from the ‘teens, a time when the craze for picture postcards was at its highest. All kinds of innovative cards were produced, such as “diamond dust” cards on which the picture was outlined in a kind of sparkle. These cards wreaked havoc with the electric stamping machines and were, for a short time, banned.

Though Christmas cards were invented in 1843, the postcard craze at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century reduced their popularity. Postcards were less expensive to send and were a quick and easy way of sending greetings to family back home.

To see more examples of Christmas postcards from the Calgary Public Library collection, visit the Community Heritage and Family History Digital Library and search the site using the term “Christmas”.

City Hall - Centennial of the Laying of the Cornerstone

by Christine L Hayes - 0 Comment(s)

City Hall

September 15 marked the 100th anniversary of the laying of the cornerstone for the "new" city hall. In 1908 dignitaries, including Mayor Arthur Cameron, R.B. Bennett and Colonel James Walker, were on hand to celebrate this momentous event.

The cornerstone is embedded outside of City Hall on the northwest side of the main entrance. It is a red granite plaque engraved with the names of the mayor and aldermen, the City Clerk and the architect, William Dodd. Dodd was dismissed in 1909 and replaced by architects Gilbert Hodgson and Ernest Butler.

A sealed copper box was placed under the cornerstone. Inside were financial reports, bylaws of the city, and a copy of the New Testament.

For more information on City Hall, visit our Virtual Tours of Historic Calgary by clicking on the link on the left side of the page.

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