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Welcome to Zinio

by Laura C - 9 Comment(s)

Calgary Public Library cardholders now have access to over 350 digital magazine subscriptions with Zinio.

NO check out limits! NO loan periods! NO waiting for holds! NO fines!

FREE with your library card!

Read the magazine on your PC or download the app to your Mobile Device or Tablet. Checkout and Keep as many digital magazines as you want for as long as you want. Share interesting articles with your Facebook following. Bookmark articles to read later or, Print off articles, pictures, recipes, or crafts from special interest magazines.

Getting Started in 5 Steps:

 To use Zinio you need two Zinio accounts.

 

  1. Log into CPL's Zinio collection with your library card number and password.
  2. Create a CPL Zinio account by clicking Create New Account and fill in all the fields.
  3. Select a magazine by cliking on its cover. Click Checkout. Click Start Reading.
  4. A Zinio.com screen will open. Click Create a Zinio.com account.
  5. Fill in the fields, using the SAME email address and password as before. Click Register.
Check out digital magazines at Calgary Public Library

Getting more out of it!

  • Browse and checkout magazines from the CPL Zinio collection. You can choose from 350+ magazine subscription titles offered free from the Calgary Public Library.
  • Once you've checked out a magazine, you use the Zinio.com website, or mobile app to download and read the magazines. Make sure that you use the SAME email address for both yourCPL Zinio and Zinio.com accounts.
  • If you are leaving the city and want to bring a digital magazine with you, download the magazine to your mobile device before you travel to ensure you have continued access to them.
  • Talk to a Library staff member to find out more!

We hope you're as excited as we are about this product! Please, give it a try and let us know what you think!

Find us on Twitter and Facebook.

Questions?

Contact us using Info Chat, call 403-260-2600 or send us an email.

Zinio at Calgary Public Library

Yoga at the Library

by Lorrie - 1 Comment(s)

I started a yoga class a year ago because I was tired of having all those little aches and pains from sitting at my desk all day. I was pretty nervous - I really knew nothing about yoga and I was worried I would look like an idiot. Would the other participants be young and flexible ? Would they be able to hold poses for hours and still look good? At the beginning every pose I held made my arms and legs shake and I realized how out of shape I was. So I set a goal for myself: get through a yoga class without shaking. I achieved my goal by doing some extra work at home. I found the yoga DVDs from the library were just what I needed to do yoga at home.

When you practice at home it can be tough to keep the kids from crawling on you and the dog from licking your face. Finding a quiet space to focus on practicing more challenging poses before the next class gave me a chance to build upper body strength.

My frugal side appreciated the use of free yoga DVDs from the public library for home practice since those yoga classes can be expensive. The DVDs helped me keep pace with the rest of the class. I developed more core strength so I wasn’t always collapsing into a heap on my mat after every pose.

Yoga DVDs were the right choice for me but not everyone's cup of tea. I found lots of library DVDs for other activities to keep my family active in in the winter months, focusing on pilates, kickboxing, drills for hockey skills. There is no excuse for not staying active at the Library!

Fall Mystery Roundup

by Pam - 0 Comment(s)

My reading pile of new mysteries beside my bed is growing out of control! I can barely keep with all the great titles that have been released this fall—there is definitely something for everyone.

I love Scandanavian mysteries and I was delighted to see two of my favorite authors releasing new titles this fall. I am just beginning to dip into Jo Nesbø's title "Police", the latest in the Harry Hole series. It looks like I have several late nights of reading ahead in this gripping follow-up to "Phantom". Another favourite is "Strange Shores" by Icelandic author, Arnaldur Indridason. This is the last in the series featuring Detective Erlandur. Haunted by his past, Erlendur sets out to find the truth behind the disappearance of his younger brother Beggi during a terrible storm many years ago.

On a lighter note, you might want to try M.C. Beaton's latest Agatha Raisin mystery, "Something Borrowed, Someone Dead", where Agatha is hired to track down the murderer of the slightly eccentric, but very entertaining widow Gloria French. It seems that she has been murdered by a poisoned bottle of elderberry wine.

Murder never takes a break — not even during the holiday season, as you will find out in "Christmas Carol Murder" by Leslie Meier. When the tight-wad Downeast Mortgage owner Jack Marlowe is murdered, there are just too many suspects. It seems everyone has a beef with him. Lucy is on a tight time line to solve the mystery before Christmas in Tinker's Cove, Maine is ruined. Look for it on our shelves soon.

Some tried and true authors who never fail to write mysteries that keep me on the edge of my seat are back this fall: Sara Paretsky with "Critical Mass: a V.I. Warshawski novel", Sue Grafton with "W is for Wasted", and Elizabeth George with "Just One Evil Act: A Lynley Novel."

There will be lots to fill up the cold winter days at the beginning of the year. I am really looking forward to the next Ian Hamilton mystery featuring one of my favourite characters, the intrepid Ava Lee. "The Two Sisters of Borneo: an Ava Lee Novel" is set to be released in February, but you can put it on hold now. And yes, it is true — the latest Ian Rankin mystery featuring beloved Rebus, "Saints of the Shadow Bible" was just released.

These are just a few of the new mysteries on the shelves at Calgary Public Library. You'll find many of them in large print, e-book or audio formats. Be sure to try them out.

Cover of Two Sisters of Borneo Cover of Saints of the Shadow Bible Cover of Christmas Carol Murder

Meet Our Volunteer Ricky!

by Katie R - 0 Comment(s)

Say Hi to Ricky!

Ricky is one of our superstar Reading Buddies volunteers. Not only has he volunteered for two years with the program, but he was also a Reading Buddies participant when he was younger. "I loved it so much that I came back!"

The Calgary Public Library's Reading Buddies program pairs youth volunteers with children in grades 1-3 to help them develop a life-long love of reading and confidence in their literacy skills.

Ricky enjoys volunteering for Reading Buddies because it is an entertaining and enriching program. As an aspiring teacher this program allows him to work with children and develop their reading abilities. Ricky takes time and care with each of his little buddies, knowing each child is unique in their strengths and interests.

He believes that volunteering is valuable not only for yourself but for your community. "Every volunteer has a meaningful impact on the community, creating a network of support and strengthening the structures of a community each time they decide to give up a bit of their time."

Without volunteers like Ricky, the Reading Buddies program would not be as successful as it is now. Thank you so much for giving up a bit of your time every week. Your hard work, dedication, and enthusiasm make you a valuable member of Calgary Public Library’s volunteer team!

To learn more about becoming a Reading Buddies volunteer please call Jody Watson at 403-221-2062.

Stocking Stuffers and Gift Ideas

by Betsy - 0 Comment(s)

Have you started thinking about gift ideas for friends or family members and come up with a blank? Here are a few thoughts to get you started, whether you are ordering online or looking for a list to take to your favourite store...

For Children:

  • Moose That Says MooMoose That Says MooA Moose That Says Moo! by Jennifer Hamburg, Illustrated by Sue Truesdell. A little girl imagines a zoo in which animals can do whatever she wants: dance, drive, read, have pillow fights... When things get slightly out of hand, what can possibly calm things down in this hilarious romp?
  • The Little Mermaid It's been 24 years since Ariel first ventured onto land to seek her Prince, enchanting audiences young and old to come along with her "unda da sea." This fall Disney has released her from the vault, in a new Diamond Edition Blu-Ray version sure to enchant both children unfamiliar with her, as well as anyone whose copies are too worn out from repeat viewings.
  • Snowflakes Fall by Patricia MacLachlan, Illustrated by Steven Kellogg. This beautiful picture book is the result of a collaboration between a Newbery winning author and the author and illustrator of over 90 books, including some of my personal favorites. It is dedicated to the children of Sandy Hook, and is comprised of a poem celebrating the circle of life and the ephemeral nature of snowflakes, amid doublepage spreads with children playing. It is a book meant to adorn a child's bookshelf and be shared among generations. Keep a kleenex handy when you read it.
  • I am Blop! by Herve Tullet Tullet's last book, Press Here, provided a fun and interactive storytelling experience for children, that resulted in it being chosen in the top 50 of a poll of the top 100 picture books. His new board book, I am Blop!, explores everyday concepts as varied as counting and colours to the animal kingdom and seasons, by introducing them as something as ephemeral as a splotch.

For Teens:

  • Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson The prolific and award-winning author of adult science fiction and fantasy writes a book for his teenage self. This YA fantasy finds a teen seeking revenge for the untimely death of his father at the hands of a madman with superpowers named Steelheart who has taken over Chicago, now called Newcago, at a time when random people have been granted amazing powers. These Epics have, unfortunately, all fallen into line behind Steelheart. Can anyone stop them?
  • Rose Under Fire by Elizabeth Wein The follow-up to Wein's Printz honour-award winning Code Name Verity packs just as much of an emotional punch. American ATA pilot Rose Justice is captured by the Nazis en route from England to Paris and sent to Ravensbrück. She recounts her stay in this notorious camp in her diary, in another three-hanky read.
  • Allegiant by Veronica Roth For all the teens who will have seen Catching Fire more than once by the holidays, the final book in Veronica Roth's trilogy will be a must-read this holiday season (finishing up the series behind Divergent and Insurgent.) The trailer for Divergent, which opens in March, 2014, starring Shailene Woodley, Theo James, and Kate Winslet, looks pretty fantastic, too.

For Adults:

  • Lawrence in Arabia: War, Deceit, Imperial Folly, and the Making of the Modern Middle East by Scott Anderson. Praise for this book is wide and unstinting: it was Amazon's August "Best Book of the Month", and called "the best work of military history in years" by the New York Times. A readable narrative nonfiction book traces many issues in today's Middle East back to a figure many people only know from an iconic Hollywood film.
  • The Orenda by Joseph Boyden A book for serious bibliophiles and literary fiction lovers, this newest novel by the Scotiabank Giller prize-winner has already been named a finalist for the Governor General's award. Boyden presents a narrative with the stories of three characters in early 17th Century Canada: a Francophone missionary, a kidnapped Iroquois teen, and a warrior named Bird who is mourning the deaths of members of his family at the hands of the Iroquois.
  • The Circle by Dave Eggers Dave Eggers' new dystopian novel has a young woman named Mae Holland getting a job with, and then pretty much turning her life over to the world's hottest Internet company. No prizes for guessing that it may resemble a company with your favourite search engine, maps, lettered email, etc.
  • The Rosie Project by Graeme C. Simsion There's no arguing that Professor Don Tillman is an expert on genetics. That's a good thing, as he has pretty much no awareness of anything else, which is evident to everyone around him, even the twelve-year-olds to whom he presents a lecture on Asperger's. His decision to find a wife comes as a shock to him, as he's never even managed a second date, but he decides to do it the way he has done everything else, by developing a Project using the scientific method, and a 16-page evaluation. It is hardly surprising then, that a bartending, drinking, smoker would be anathema to him, yet when he meets Rosie, she not only needs his help for her own project, she manages to teach him how to experience life.


Don't forget that many of these are likely available in our catalogue in alternate formats (BookCD, Large Print, etc.), or in Overdrive as an e-book or e-audiobook, if you'd like to add them to your own reading lists. If you've found another ideal gift, please feel free to add it to the comments.

A Good Scare!

by Laura C - 0 Comment(s)

Like Graphic Novels? Try out these manga about things that go "bump in the night" from three masters of the genre — and satisfy your seasonal interest in ghosts, monsters, and the paranormal!

You won't have to sleep with the lights on after reading Cowa!, Akira Toriyama's charming series about the trouble-making half vampire/half were-koala Paifu!

Together with his timid ghost friend José, and his nemesis Arpon, Paifu sets off on an adventure to find the medicine needed to save his village from the deadly monster-flu. And, when they enlist the aid of the hermit (a grumpy human named Maruyama) to help them, they get more than they bargained for

Cowa! (pronounced KOE-WAH, as in 'Koa'la!) was the first major work by Akira Toriyama since his completion of Dragon Ball in 1995.

It features the same bold art-style, and likeable characters that made his long-running series Dr. Slump and Dragon Ball so popular -- and such a joy to read. I highly recommend it!

Find it in the Juvenile Graphix collection!

Shigeru Mizuki's Kitaro is one of the most famous and influential series in Japanese manga history. Why is it so important? Because, through works like Kitaro, Shigeru Mizuki is responsible for popularizing Japanese folklore, and to some extent, creating it as well.

Kitaro is a compilation of short episodic stories written between 1967 and 1969. It features the hero Kitaro, who along with his father (an anthropomorphized eyeball) is the last member of the ghost tribe. He challenges legendary monsters (or yokai) and does good deeds to fight for peace between monsters and humans.

As fun as the stories are (and they are really fun!), the most interesting bit of this manga to me is the visual "monster" glossary at the end of the book which explains all of the mysterious and bizarre Japanese monsters Mizuki draws. Fascinating!

Find it in the YA Graphix collection!

Junji Ito's Uzumaki is a beautifully drawn manga featuring a twisted and disturbing story. Ito, a master of classic Japanese horror is someone you definitely don't want to miss!

Uzumaki is a story of a town spiralling out of control. The haunting and hypnotic shape of the uzumaki (spiral) swirls madness in everything from staircases to snail shells in the cursed coast town of Kurozu-cho.

Uzumaki begins episodically with seemingly disconnected stories but by the end it pulls these stories together into a mystifying ending. I'm definitely a fan of this work, and so excited about the release of the omnibus edition later this month.

Uzumaki is currently on order for the Adult Graphix collection -- place your hold to read it first!

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