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    Book Club in a Bag

    Summer. Read. Week Two!

    Summer. Read. Week Two!

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    Play

    Most adults think of play as something only children do, but it’s important to recognize that we all play in some way or another!

    What does play mean to you? Whether it’s throwing a frisbee to your dog, kayaking down the Bow or playing chess at the Central library downtown, playing is an important part of everyone’s life and it can provide much needed physical and mental exercise. Isn’t exercise more fun when you’re playing? The Calgary Public library has as many books about play as there are games to play, so come on in or peruse our website for a variety of options.

    Get your hands dirty and play in one of our new Encana sponsored community gardens at the Southwood and Forest Lawn libraries. If gardening is your thing, the library has hundreds of books and resources to help you plant and maintain a healthy looking garden all summer.

    Others like to play in the kitchen. Take a look at the thousands of cookbooks to suit all levels from novice to master chef.

    To some, the world is their playground, take a look at our travel collection for guidebooks and travel stories for your next “playcation”.

    So join the Calgary Public Library for a 9-week summer reading adventure. Each week we're diving into a new theme: explore, play, imagine, create, live, laugh, learn, grow and… be. Together we’ll discover new books that will keep you reading all summer. We’ll post information about the weekly theme every Wednesday here on our Readers’ Nook blog and on our Facebook page. When you comment on our Summer.Read. Facebook posts, and tell us what books or DVDs or CDs (etc!) you’ve been enjoying, you’ll also be entered to win great prizes. (CPL tote bags and Kobo Readers!) You can also enter by picking up a paper ballot at your local library.

    Basketball

    Zen Gardening

    Discover India

    Leiths Simple Cookery

    Basketball: Steps to Success

    by Hal Wissel

    Zen Gardening

    by Sunniva Harte

    Lonely Planet's: Discover India

    Leiths Simple Cookery

    by Viv Pidgeon & Jenny Stringer

    Summer. Read. 2012...Week 1!

    Summer. Read. 2012...Week 1!

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    This week's theme is: Explore

    ... and there’s no better place to do that than at your library in the summer! Come and check out our resources on exploring Calgary! Or maybe you’re more interested in exploring further afield and we can hook you up with a guidebook to Tuscany or even Mars!

    We like a challenge, so we’re willing to bet that no matter what your area of exploration, we’ll be able to find you something at the Library. Because not only do we have great physical collections, but you can also check our E-Library for e-books and read today’s newspapers from around the world. Or explore a world of music by borrowing a CD from our rich music collection…Explore and enjoy!

    So join the Calgary Public Library for a 9-week summer reading adventure. Each week we're diving into a new theme: explore, play, imagine, create, live, laugh, learn, grow and… be. Together we’ll discover new books that will keep you reading all summer. We’ll post information about the weekly theme every Wednesday here and on our Readers’ Nook blog and on our Facebook page. When you comment on our Summer.Read. Facebook posts, and tell us what books or DVDs or CDs (etc!) you’ve been enjoying, you’ll also be entered to win great prizes!

    Grazing : a healthier approach to snacks and finger foods / Julie Van Rosendaal.

    Hitchhikers’ Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

    Insight Guides: Tuscany

    Packing for Mars by Mary Roach

     

     

    Summer. Read. 2012!

    Summer. Read. 2012!

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    Welcome to Summer. Read. 2012, our annual reading program for adults!

    Join the Calgary Public Library for a 9-week reading adventure, beginning on Wednesday June 20. Each week we’ll dive into a new theme: explore, play, imagine, create, live, laugh, learn, grow and… be. Together we’ll discover new books that will keep you reading all summer.

    It’s easy to participate in our Summer. Read. program either in person, or on Facebook!

    Visit your favorite branch, or to one you’ve never been before, and browse the Summer. Read. 2012 display with books, DVDs and CDs that connect to the theme. In each displayed item you’ll find a ballot. Fill in the ballot by sharing a review of an item you borrowed and return the ballot to the library for your chance to win.

    We’ll also post information about the weekly theme every Wednesday here and on our Readers’ Nook blog and on our Facebook page. When you comment on our Summer.Read. Facebook posts, and tell us what books or DVDs or CDs (etc.!) you’ve been enjoying, you’ll also be entered to win great prizes!


    Did we say prizes?!

    The Weekly Prize at every branch is a Calgary Public Library tote bag for all the books, CDs and DVDs you borrow as well as a Calgary Public Library journal. One online participant will also win a bag and journal each week.

    The Grand Prize is a Kobo Reader! At the end of the contest 10 Kobo Readers will be given out. All the weekly ballots from all our branches will be pooled for a chance to win 9 Kobo Readers, and all the online posts will be pooled for a chance to win 1 Kobo Reader.

    So start flexing your reading muscles and prepare to enjoy some great summer reads with us this summer!

    Facebook Live Chat

    To get the ball rolling, join us on Facebook Wednesday June 20th from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. as we kick off Summer.Read. 2012 with a live Library Chat. Tell us your last three favourite reads and we’ll give you suggestions for your next great book.

    Then join us every Wednesday after that until August 29 for more great reading suggestions in our Readers’ Nook and on Facebook.

    Until then, here are a few of our favourite reads for summer!

    Staff Picks - Stuart McLean's Vinyl Café

    by Jasna - 0 Comment(s)

     

    Canadian author Stuart McLean is the host of the CBC Radio show The Vinyl Cafe. I had often heard of The Vinyl Cafe, but hadn't actually listened to any of the stories until I caught the show in passing while listening to the radio one day. I immediately discovered why the show is so popular. The stories are laugh-out-loud funny, and Stuart McLean's voice is perfect for telling them.

    The stories center around Dave, the owner of the Vinyl Café, a second-hand record shop in Toronto (motto “We May Not Be Big, But We’re Small”), his wife, Morley, and their children, Stephanie and Sam. Dave is always well-meaning but inescapably prone to trouble, whether it’s accidentally changing the outgoing message on a neighbour’s answering machine, trying out a coffin, mixing up the alcoholic and non-alcoholic punch bowls at a holiday party, or testing out a neighbour’s new bicycle while it is mounted on the roof of said neighbour’s car. In the stories you will also meet Dave's friends and neighbours - Kenny Wong, owner of a Scottish Meat Pie shop, Ted and Polly Anderson, Rasheeda and Ahmeer, and Bert and Mary Turlington.

    Author Stuart McLean performs the stories live, so you can hear the reaction of the audience. The stories are also short (about 20 minutes each) and family friendly, so they are perfect for trips with children or with grandparents in the car. They are also a good way to pass the time if you happen to be at an airport, or are stuck in an RV on a rainy day. (And every family member will end up with a favourite story!)

    The Calgary Public Library has several Vinyl Café book CDs, and we also have Vinyl Café books if you prefer your short stories in print form. (The books of stories from The Vinyl Cafe have won the Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal for Humour three times.)

    Storyland (Book CD)

    Coast to Coast Story Service (Book CD)

    Home From the Vinyl Cafe: a year of stories (Book)

    Extreme Vinyl Cafe (Book)

    K. M.

    In Memoriam: Ray Bradbury (1920 – 2012)

    by Jasna - 0 Comment(s)

     

    Ray Bradbury was best known for Fahrenheit 451, a dystopyan novel about about a totalitarian, anti-intellectual society where banned books are burned by 'firemen.' The title refers to the temperature at which paper ignites.

    "A giant of American literature, who helped popularize science fiction", he published more than 500 works, including The Illustrated Man and Something Wicked This Way Comes. Bradbury once said he did not want to predict the future - but sometimes wanted to prevent it.

    He was 91 years old.

    All Things Royal

    by Suzen - 2 Comment(s)

    When I was a kid, we would have to sing “God Save the Queen” every morning; along with “O Canada” and the first and last verses of the “Ode to Newfoundland” (we were a very choral and nationalistic bunch). There was a large portrait of Queen Elizabeth II in the main foyer of the school and she’d peer down at us with those matronly royal blue eyes as if she was actually watching everything we did. There was a time when I had myself convinced her eyes actually followed me around the room, like one of those paintings on the walls of a haunted house. She was always watching…

    As Elizabeth II celebrates her 60th year of reign this month, I don’t feel like I should send her a card but I do find myself thinking about all the historical fiction I read that are set in within the varying eras of royal life in Britain. From Tudor England to the Victorian Age, the royal families are steeped in betrayals, secrets, lies and unceasingly complicated plot twists. And the best historical novels, while grounded in fact, take liberties to expose the human side of those famous historical figures.

    So, to commemorate the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II, I present to the court the following list of royally inspired novels. May you read them with a hot cup of tea and a stately sense of self!

    The Queen of Last HopesThe Queen of Last Hopes by Susan Higginbotham

    Margaret of Anjou, Queen of England, does not want immortality. She does not need glory. All she desires is what rightfully belongs to her family – and that is the throne of England. Her husband the king cannot rule, but the enemies who doubt her will and dispute her valor underestimate the force of a mother’s love. Her son is the House of Lancaster’s heir and last hope, and her fight for him will shake the crown forever. (Back cover)

    The Flaw in the BloodA Flaw in the Blood: a novel of suspense by Stephanie Barron

    Windsor Castle, 1861. For the second time in over twenty years, Irish barrister Patrick Fitzgerald has been summoned by the Queen. The first time, he'd been a zealous young legal clerk, investigating what appeared to be a murderous conspiracy against her. Now he is a distinguished gentleman at the top of his profession. And the Queen is a woman in the grip of fear. For on this chilly night, her beloved husband, Prince Albert, lies dying. With her future clouded by grief, Fitzgerald can't help but notice the Queen is curiously preoccupied with the past. Yet why, and how he can help, is unclear. His bewilderment deepens when the royal coach is violently overturned, nearly killing him and his brilliant young ward, Dr. Georgiana Armistead, niece of the late Dr. Snow, a famed physician who'd attended none other than Her Majesty. Fitzgerald is sure of one thing: the Queen's carriage was not attacked at random--it was a carefully chosen target. But was it because he rode in it? Fitzgerald won't risk dying in order to find out. He'll leave London and take Georgiana with him--if they can get out alive. For soon the pair find themselves hunted. Little do they know they each carry within their past hidden clues to a devastating royal secret...one they must untangle if they are to survive. From the streets of London to the lush hills of Cannes, from the slums of St. Giles to the gilded halls of Windsor Castle, A Flaw in the Blood delivers a fascinating tale of pursuit, and the artful blend of period detail and electrifying intrigue that only the remarkable Stephanie Barron can devise. (Syndetics)

    The Bones of AvalonThe Bones of Avalon: being edited from the most private documents of Dr John Dee, astrologer and consultant to Queen Elizabeth by Phillip Rickman

    A country divided. A newly crowned, desperately vulnerable young queen. Can one man uncover the secret that will save her throne? It is 1560, and Elizabeth Tudor has been on the throne for a year. Dr. John Dee, at 32 already acclaimed throughout Europe, is her astrologer and consultant in the hidden arts... a controversial appointment in these days of superstition and religious strife. When dangerous questions of Elizabeth's legitimacy arise, the mild, bookish Dee finds himself summoned before William Cecil, who tasks him with an important mission. Along with Robert Dudley, Dee's daring friend and former student who is also rumored to be the Queen's secret lover, Dee must travel to the famously mystical town of Glastonbury to find the missing bones of King Arthur. Once these long-lost relics, the embodiment of a legacy vitally important to the Tudor line, are ensconced in London, doubts as to the Queen's supremacy as the rightful Tudor heir will be dispelled. But the quest quickly turns deadly--Dee and Dudley arrive in Glastonbury to discover the town mourning the gruesome execution of its abbot, and more death soon follows at the old abbey. Racing to uncover the secrets buried there, Dee finds himself caught in the tangled roots of English magic, unexpected violence, the breathless stirring of first love... and the cold heart of a complex plot against Elizabeth. (Syndetics)

    The Uncommon ReaderThe Uncommon Reader by Alan Bennett

    Briskly original and subversively funny, this novella from popular British writer Bennett (Untold Stories; Tony-winning play The History Boys) sends Queen Elizabeth II into a mobile library van in pursuit of her runaway corgis and into the reflective, observant life of an avid reader. Guided by Norman, a former kitchen boy and enthusiast of gay authors, the queen gradually loses interest in her endless succession of official duties and learns the pleasure of such a "common" activity. With "the dawn of her sensibility... mistaken for the onset of senility," plots are hatched by the prime minister and the queen's staff to dispatch Norman and discourage the queen's preoccupation with books. Ultimately, it is her own growing self-awareness that leads her away from reading and toward writing, with astonishing results. Bennett has fun with the proper behavior and protocol at the palace, and the few instances of mild coarseness seem almost scandalous. There are lessons packed in here, but Bennett doesn't wallop readers with them. It's a fun little book. (Publisher’s Weekly Review)