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    Book Club in a Bag

    Not all Hearts and Cupids - Part II

    by Jasna - 0 Comment(s)

    There are a few famous love stories less tragic than the ones featured last week, of course. Still marked by challenges, sacrifices and obstacles of all sorts – that is, after all, what makes them timeless – these at least didn’t claim the very lives – or body parts – of the parties involved.

    Odysseus and Penelope

    Their love was put through one of the most difficult tests – waiting. After he fought in the Trojan War for 10 years, it took Odysseus as much time to return home. In the meantime, Penelope had to turn down 108 suitors, anxious to take her husband’s place. On his long voyage home, Odysseus himself was tempted by everlasting love, eternal youth, and many other hard-to-resist promises, but stayed devoted and loyal to his wife.

    Napoleon and Josephine

    They are proof that a marriage of convenience can nurture true love and passion, if only temporarily. At age 26, Napoleon married Josephine, a prominent, wealthy (and six-years-older) widow and they fell deeply in love with each other. Napoleon, as we know, wasn't a homey type - like Odysseus, he found war games way more interesting. Unfortunately, unlike Penelope, Josephine wasn’t big on waiting. While Napoleon was busy campaigning far away from home, his wife got lonely and found solace in a string of lovers, starting with a handsome Hussar lieutenant. Napoleon retaliated with the wife of his junior officer, and so on… Infidelity aside, they were unable to produce a much-needed heir for the Emperor, so they divorced. Napoleon married Marie Louise of Austria and had a son with her. Josephine remained single, but stayed on good terms with her ex.


    Scarlet O’Hara and Rhett Butler

    “Rhett, Rhett… Rhett, if you go, where shall I go? What shall I do?”

    “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn…”


    Jane Eyre and Edward Rochester

    She is plain in appearance, poor, and lonely. He is also not easy on the eyes, rich and lonely. They grow closer, revealing a tender heart beneath his rough exterior (Edward) and budding self-confidence (Jane). The roadblock this time is no less than polygamy, not an easy stunt to pull off, even in the times of more flexible morality that was England at the turn of the nineteenth century: on her wedding day, Jane discovered Edward was already married to a mentally incapacitated wife. Jane ran away, only to return later to find Edward’s mansion destroyed by fire, and Edward himself blind yet conveniently widowed... This time there were no barriers for their love to triumph.


    Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy

    Finally, here is one happy love story: the end of the novel found Miss Pride and Mr. Prejudice alive, in love and in possession of all their body parts. We were left to believe they married and lived happily ever after... or did they? (wink)

    On the 200th anniversary of this novel (a couple weeks ago), it's the perfect time to revisit the classic love story.

    ...And if you find you're in the mood now for some sugar-coated romance and a box of chocolates, have a browse through our Next Reads newsletters for recommended Romance titles!

    Happy Valentine's!

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