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    Book Club in a Bag

    Your Fall Reading List is Here

    by Sonya - 1 Comment(s)

    Now that the "September rush" is over—Yikes! October already!—are you looking for something new to read? Find out which books are the most talked about, read reviews, and see what will go on your own reading list. I've compiled a few links to various recommended reading lists, and for once, I've also finished reading one of the hot new titles that appears on several of the lists! So, I'll start with my own recommendations and go from there.

    Margaret Atwood's MaddAddam completes her dystopian trilogy that started with Oryx and Crake and The Year of the Flood. [Spoiler alert: if you haven't read them, stop reading this right now and go read Oryx and Crake!] The first two novels presented alternate, and interwoven, viewpoints of the same timeline of events in a chillingly believable future version of our world. Genetically modified organisms and genetic-enhancement cosmetic procedures abound; powerful "Corps" control money, media, politics, and the lives and deaths of the nameless masses trying to survive the toxic pleeblands. Various secret groups and splinter cults try to undermine or avoid the influence of the Corps... and one young scientific genius, Crake, either madman or visionary, has had enough. Crake engineers both the mass extinction of humanity and the birth of a new type of human. MaddAddam continues the story as a handful of humans, together with the "Crakers," try to survive in the aftermath.

    If, like me, you are fascinated by the complex world and characters Atwood created in the first two novels, you have to read the third. What I loved about this novel is it allows us to discover the Crakers both as individuals and as a new culture, as this culture develops. There is also the thread of storytelling, and how it is linked to our legends and beliefs. Atwood is a master storyteller and weaves her magic once again in this novel. Along with the feeling of completion and melancholy having just finished reading MaddAddam, I also feel anticipation—time to go back to Oryx and Crake and read them all again.

    CBC Fall Reading List:

    On this list, you'll find both Atwood's latest and Lawrence Hill's Massey Lecture, Blood: the Stuff of Life. If you haven't read anything from Lawrence Hill, now is the perfect time! His fantastic novel The Book of Negroes, which I've blogged about before, is the chosen book for this year's One Book, One Calgary events.

     

    Quill & Quire Canadian:

    More notable Canadian fiction, including both new and familiar names.

    Quill & Quire International:

    Among new efforts from several big names, including Stephen King, Elizabeth Gilbert, Amy Tan, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Chuck Palanhiuk, the one that caught my eye is The Guts by Roddy Doyle, described as a sequel to his breakout novel The Commitments. This time around, the characters first introduced as young musicians in a band are middle aged family guys, and dealing with cancer. With Doyle's signature warmth and humour, it should be a good one.

     

    Publisher's Weekly Fall Books Preview:

    This extensive list (with reminders to check back as more titles are added) includes material for all ages, with links to more in-depth listings. One that caught my eye is a debut fiction novel from a True Crime writer. If that sounds interesting, check out The Edge of Normal by Carla Norton. The plot involves the kidnapping of a 13-year old girl.

    Oprah's Books into Movies:

    One of my all-time favourite novels, The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak, appears on this list. Personally, I always read the book first (and, truthfully, am often disappointed by movie adaptations), so if this one's slipped under your radar, now is the time to read it before the movie is released. Although categorized as a young adult novel, this one transcends age boundaries and has wide appeal. To paraphrase the summary in our catalogue: "[i]n superbly crafted writing that burns with intensity, award-winning author Markus Zusak has given us one of the most enduring stories of our time." This unforgettable novel, narrated by Death, is the story of a young girl living in a small German town in 1939.

     

    What's on your reading list this fall? Let us know in the comments.

    Comments

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    by Shannon C

    Lots of great fodder here to keep me happy for a long time. I'm going to start with Maddaddam, but I might need to refresh my memory on Oryx and Crake and Year of the Flood first...

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