You are here: Home > Blogs > Readers' Nook

Latest Posts

  • Nov 13 - Words In Beige - Why beige? Isn’t beige boring, un-flavourful and well um … boring?
  • Nov 2 - Little Mosque on the Prairie - Join the creator an evening of humour and storytelling at the Central Library
  • Oct 17 - Books about Obsession - Two mesmerizing novels about that ever dangerous human emotion
  • Oct 7 - Books to Movies - What to read before you watch — or watch before you read
On Line

Select another pool to see the results

    Book Club in a Bag

    Stop the Presses!

    by Shannon Slater - 0 Comment(s)

    This just in – reading fiction makes you smarter and more socially perceptive!

    University of Toronto Professor Keith Oatley has studied your brain on fiction and concluded that because you have to create meaning from the text and imagine “possible selves in possible worlds” it works your brain and your social I.Q. While all fiction helps, Professor Oatley thinks that literary fiction builds those brain muscles the best so why not try these engaging and entertaining titles and add to those grey cells!

    The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

    Despite his overwhelming fear of interacting with people, Christopher, a mathematically-gifted, autistic fifteen-year-old boy, decides to investigate the murder of a neighbor's dog and uncovers secret information about his mother.

    Beloved by Toni Morrison

    After the Civil War ends, Sethe longingly recalls the two-year-old daughter whom she killed when threatened with recapture after escaping from slavery 18 years before.

    Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

    The family of a fierce evangelical Baptist missionary--Nathan Price, his wife, and his four daughters--begins to unravel after they embark on a 1959 mission to the Belgian Congo, where they find their lives forever transformed over the course of three decades by the political and social upheaval of Africa.

    No Great Mischief by Alistair MacLeod

    After being orphaned, Alexander MacDonald comes to Cape Breton Island yearning for family connections and finds himself working in the mines with his wild older brother and caring for another brother, who is dying.

    One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez

    Tells the story of the Buendia family, set against the background of the evolution and eventual decadence of a small South American town.

    *Annotations courtesy of NoveList, a database that recommends fiction and non-fiction books by author, plot, setting and topic and includes book reviews.

    If you want to use this resource for great reads, just click here and log on with your Calgary Public Library card.

    What’s your favourite read that makes you think?

    Comments

    This Post Comments RSS 2.0
    No Comments

    Add a Comment

    *
     
     
    *