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    Summer. Read. Week 9 — Be

    Summer. Read. Week 9 — Be

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    Our final theme for Summer. Read. is ‘BE.’  Unplug and explore the new you.  BE the answer to yourself or to others. BE someone, BE somewhere, BE the dream, or BE the change in your own or someone else’s life.  Get answers to all your desires and aspirations right here at your Calgary Public Library. You can find these answers in various formats — books, DVDs, CDs, and even e-books. 

    Rediscover or challenge yourself, explore somewhere new or find out how others have realized their dreams, with the following books from our collection:

          

    For some thought-provoking, intricately-woven, and insightful stories that will inspire you to ‘BE,’ here are some newly-released works from our fiction collection: 

             

     

    About Summer. Read.

    Discover new books that will keep you reading all summer in our Summer. Read. contest for adults!

    To enter:

    1. Check the weekly theme every Wednesday, either at your local branch or right here online

    2. Borrow a new (to you!) book, DVD or CD from the Library that fits that theme.

    3. Fill in the online ballot to tell us what you're reading (or watching, or listening to) and enter to win one of five 32 GB Google Nexus 7 Tablets, and weekly prizes of leather-bound journals and Calgary Public Library tote bags. You can also enter by filling out a paper ballot at your local branch. Good luck!

    Summer. Read. Week 8 — Grow

    Summer. Read. Week 8 — Grow

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    "Do you know, in Sanskrit the root of the verb to be is the same as to grow or to make grow?"

    This quote comes from the action-packed, blockbuster movie My Dinner with Andre. The point that the character Andre is making is that in some cultures the act of growing is an essential part of life. Or, as a milk commercial from a few years ago put it: “Always grow. Grow all ways.” The lesson we can take away is that to be as fully alive as possible we must grow.

    The Calgary Public Library has an almost limitless selection of materials that can assist you in growing in a number of different ways.  Whether you are interested in growing a garden, financial security or your muscles, the library has material that can help you out, like the following:

                        

     

    And once you have your personal growth taken care of, then you can think about helping your kids grow too with books like: Homesick and Happy: How Time Away from Parents Can Help a Child Grow and Don’t Lick the Minivan: and Other Things I Never Thought I’d Say to My Kids.  So grab a book, pour yourself a big glass of milk, and grow.

     

    About Summer. Read.

    Discover new books that will keep you reading all summer in our Summer. Read. contest for adults!

    To enter:

    1. Check the weekly theme every Wednesday, either at your local branch or right here online

    2. Borrow a new (to you!) book, DVD or CD from the Library that fits that theme.

    3. Fill in the online ballot to tell us what you're reading (or watching, or listening to) and enter to win one of five 32 GB Google Nexus 7 Tablets, and weekly prizes of leather-bound journals and Calgary Public Library tote bags. You can also enter by filling out a paper ballot at your local branch. Good luck!

    Summer. Read. Week 7 — Learn

    Summer. Read. Week 7 — Learn

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    Learn image banner

     

    “If you hold a cat by the tail you learn things you cannot learn any other way.” ~Mark Twain

    Whatever or however you go about it, there are many less painful ways to learn through the Library.  From the Adirondacks to zebras, medicine to music, languages to life skills, it is easy to learn something new every day. 

    Even better, there are so many different ways you can learn with the Library.  Listen to an audio-book or an e-audio  book.  Read a book or e-book. Watch a movie (Blu-Ray or DVD).  Do a course online.  Here are some suggestions to get you started.

    Audio-Books

    With Family Financial Freedom: How to Balance Your Budget and Drive Away Debt by Brian Tracy, learn how to set and achieve million-dollar goals.  (Also available in Talking Book MP3 format for persons with special needs and as a Windows Media file on Overdrive.).

    Books

    From Adirondack chairs, patio bars and picnic tables to Victorian trellises and planters, the experts at American Woodworker provide complete plans and instructions for building great-looking pieces that will beautify your outdoor space in

    E-Books

    Combining fresh and pithy life lessons, often with just a sentence or two and deceptively simple diagrams and graphs, How to be Interesting (In 10 Easy steps) by Jessica Hagy is an inspiring guide that shows you how to lead a richer life.  Electronic Resource – available through Overdrive. Overdrive items can be accessed through the Library catalogue or through the E-Library link on the Library web site (select the Reading and eBooks category).

    Movies

    Learn valuable lessons about conquering fear in pursuit of your dreams in Chasing Mavericks, starring Jonny Weston, Gerard Butler, and Elisabeth Shue.

    Online Courses

    Learn4Life, one of our newest databases, has an awesome collection of interactive courses that you can do from home.  You can learn how to write that novel and then how to publish it.  You can also take courses on MS-Office software, various photo editing software, web technology, and much, much more. 

     

    About Summer. Read.

    Discover new books that will keep you reading all summer in our Summer. Read. contest for adults!

    To enter:

    1. Check the weekly theme every Wednesday, either at your local branch or right here online

    2. Borrow a new (to you!) book, DVD or CD from the Library that fits that theme.

    3. Fill in the online ballot to tell us what you're reading (or watching, or listening to) and enter to win one of five 32 GB Google Nexus 7 Tablets, and weekly prizes of leather-bound journals and Calgary Public Library tote bags. You can also enter by filling out a paper ballot at your local branch. Good luck!

    Read, Laugh and WIN

    Read, Laugh and WIN

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    “Tragedy is when I cut my finger. Comedy is when you walk into an open sewer and die."
    ~Mel Brooks

    Ask 10 people what makes them laugh and you will probably get 10 different answers. But whether your taste in comedy runs to Mel Brooks or Monty Python movies, Dilbert or Garfield cartoons, or classic recordings by Bill Cosby or Bob Newhart, you will find a wealth of humourous material at the Calgary Public Library. From DVDs to Book CDs, cartoon collections to funny fiction and memoirs, we have a wide variety of items to tickle your funny bone.

          

     

    “Question: How do you get 200 drunken Canadians out of a swimming pool?
    Answer: You say, ‘Excuse me, could you please get out of the pool?’”
    ~Will Ferguson

    Even when we’re laughing at ourselves, Canadians love a good joke (or a bad one!) Check out the wit and wisdom of Canadian humourists next time you are at the library.

        

    About Summer. Read.

    Discover new books that will keep you reading all summer in our Summer. Read. contest for adults!

    To enter:

    1. Check the weekly theme every Wednesday, either at your local branch or right here online

    2. Borrow a new (to you!) book, DVD or CD from the Library that fits that theme.

    3. Fill in the online ballot to tell us what you're reading (or watching, or listening to) and enter to win one of five 32 GB Google Nexus 7 Tablets, and weekly prizes of leather-bound journals and Calgary Public Library tote bags. You can also enter by filling out a paper ballot at your local branch. Good luck!

    Summer. Read. Week 5 — Live

    Summer. Read. Week 5 — Live

    - 3 Comment(s)

     

     

    “My formula for living is quite simple. I get up in the morning

    and I go to bed at night. In between, I occupy myself as best I can.” ~Cary Grant

    Cary Grant had an interesting philosophy on living. Here are three books by people who created their own formula for living and which provide some ideas for good living.

    For a summer read full of spiritual guidance and meaning try: Fear: Essential Wisdom For Getting Through the Storm by Thich Nhat Hanh. Hanh is a Vietnamese Buddhist Zen Master, poet and scholar who has published a number of books on peaceful living. 

    This book extolls the practice of living in the present to embrace our fears, recognize their origins, and thereby render them powerless. His book is short but powerfully written, in beautifully clear prose.

    The word ‘Live’ has different connotations for blogger Hugh MacLeod. In his third book Freedom is Blogging in Your Underwear, he argues that real  happiness isn’t power or money: it is freedom to pursue your passion in life. MacLeod was a struggling cartoonist waiting for a big break to become syndicated in newspapers.

    He stopped waiting and started acting by establishing his own blog to showcase his cartoons. It was a huge success, and his dream was fulfilled. His book is funny and light but with the ever-present message that thinking outside the box in your pursuit of a dream can have some hilarious and satisfying consequences.

    To live well sometimes is more of a challenge for some people than others. Answering life’s challenges with laughter is the path Sara Benincasa takes in Agorafabulous! Dispatches From My Bedroom.  Podcast host and award-winning comedian Benincasa recounts her struggles with agoraphobia, an anxiety disorder where the sufferer perceives the environment as being difficult to escape or get help.

    Her first response to her disorder was to freak out and hide—her bed became her refuge, and she was too afraid to even go to her own bathroom. She charts her path to acceptance and happiness with therapy, homemade smoothies, shopping for vintage clothes, and the timely intervention of friends and family.

    This book never falls into whiney mush but keeps the tone light and fun, resulting in a positive and uplifting read.         

                                                                     

    Discover new books that will keep you reading all summer in our Summer. Read. contest for adults!

    To enter:

    1. Check the weekly theme every Wednesday, either at your local branch or right here online

    2. Borrow a new (to you!) book, DVD or CD from the Library that fits that theme.

    3. Fill in the online ballot to tell us what you're reading (or watching, or listening to) and enter to win one of five 32 GB Google Nexus 7 Tablets, and weekly prizes of leather-bound journals and Calgary Public Library tote bags. You can also enter by filling out a paper ballot at your local branch. Good luck!

    Summer. Read. Week 4 — Create

    Summer. Read. Week 4 — Create

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    Our Summer. Read. contest is finally here!

    With the Central Library closed and our website down due to the recent flood, the online portion of Summer. Read. is a few weeks behind schedule. We're now back up and running with a few changes: the online contest will now be seven weeks long instead of 10 and we have more weekly prizes to give away in a shorter time period! So without further delay...


    It's easy to be inspired in the summer!

    With new books, DVDs, and magazines coming into the library all the time, you can always find new ways to be creative.  How can you be creative this week?  How about starting that novel you’ve wanted to write?  Could you learn to play an instrument or get involved in a new hobby? 

    Visit any of our 17 branches and discover all the new and exciting ways to express your creativity!  Then fill in an online ballot (or a paper version at your branch) to tell us which books, CDs, or DVDs are stoking your creative fire and you will be entered to win a 32 GB Google Nexus 7 tablet and great weekly prizes.

    About Summer. Read.

    Discover new books that will keep you reading all summer in our Summer. Read. contest for adults!

    Summer. Read. is a summer-long reading adventure! Every week we'll feature a new theme in our Readers’ Nook blog to inspire you to borrow a new book, DVD or CD from the Library. Fill out an online ballot to tell us what you're reading (or watching, or listening to) and enter to win one of five 32 GB Google Nexus 7 Tablets, and weekly prizes of leather-bound journals and Calgary Public Library tote bags. You can also enter by filling out a paper ballot at your local branch. Good luck!

    Welcome to Summer. Read. 2013

    Welcome to Summer. Read. 2013

    - 1 Comment(s)

    It's summertime; the living is easy and the reading is great!

    Join us for Summer. Read. 2013, a 10-week adventure for adults beginning Wednesday June 19.

    We'll share some fantastic reading suggestions every week and together we'll Explore, Play, Imagine, Create, Live, Laugh, Learn, Grow and… Be. Our mission is to introduce you to new and exciting finds just waiting to be discovered. When you share what you've been reading, (or watching, or listening to) you'll be entered to win great prizes!

    How to Enter

    Go to your local Calgary Public Library branch and check the Summer. Read. display with books, DVDs and CDs that connect to the weekly theme. In each displayed item you’ll find a ballot. Fill in the ballot by sharing a review of an item you borrowed in that fits with the weekly theme, and return the ballot to the library for your chance to win.

    Image of Summer Read Facebook launch adTo participate online visit our Readers’ Nook Blog to see the weekly themes, and book suggestions. Read something in the selected theme and leave a comment on our blog post about the book CD or DVD you've been enjoying. Your name will be entered to win weekly prizes and the grand prize draw!

    Update: Now that our website is live again, please stay tuned to our Readers' Nook blog -- the Summer. Read. themes are coming soon!

    Did we say prizes?!

    The weekly prize at every location is a Calgary Public Library bag for all the books, CDs and DVDs you borrow, as well as a journal that you can use to keep track of all the great material you borrow from the Library!

    The grand prizes are 5 Google NEXUS 7 (32 GB) Tablets! The grand prize draws will take place on Wednesday, September 4th, 2013. The last day to drop off your ballots for the grand prize draw is Wednesday, August 28.

    Facebook Live Chat

    To get the ball rolling, join us on Facebook Wednesday June 19th from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. as we kick off Summer.Read. with a live Library Chat. Tell us your last three favourite reads and we’ll give you suggestions for your next great book.

    Then join us every Wednesday after that until August 28 for more great reading suggestions in our Readers’ Nook.

    Here are a few of our favourite reads for summer, just to get you started!

    The Keeper of Lost Causes book cover  Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry book cover  The Expected One book cover  The Winter Palace book cover  Mistress of the Art of Death book cover

     

     

     

    Off the Shelf: Canada

    by Jasna - 0 Comment(s)

    Picture of book cover: Canada by Richard FordCanada by Richard Ford is a mystery novel. Not a whodunit, since Ford explicitly tells us what will happen on the first page. Also, the novel is styled as the memoirs of a retired teacher, who has long lived with the violent events in his youth. The mystery in Part One is “Why?”. Why did his rather normal parents stage an armed robbery? The mystery in Part Two is “When?”. When will the murder happen? The mystery of the novel as a whole is “Who”? The most elemental mystery: Who am I?

    Dell is fifteen during the action of the novel. An introspective boy, he has learned to make the best of any situation. One could consider that this was because his father was in the US air force and the family moved often. Except that his twin sister learned sneering bravado and discontent.

    After his father’s dishonorable discharge, living in Great Fall infused discontent into every family member. Rather stoically, Dell straightens his mental landscape. He learns chess, sadly playing by himself most of the time, and develops his interest in bee keeping, while waiting to go to school in September. Crashing into his carefully managed thoughts and good intentions are the bank robbery and arrest of his parents in front of the two children. In a strangled sort of logic, his mother had arranged for the disposition of her twins prior to the robbery, and Dell is called upon again to adapt to almost untenable circumstances.

    Which he does. In a dilapidated village in southern Saskatchewan. Canada is the terra incognita. This novel plays out entirely in the mind of a well-behaved teenager growing into adulthood. His thinking cracks like the voice of a teenaged boy. He imagines that he is navigating on a successful course, only to be unexpectedly jolted by strange adult behaviours. Each time, he tries to incorporate these new lessons into his perception of adulthood, although even he understands that all the adults who keep changing his life are highly unreliable. Thus, through his own thoughtfulness, Dell does steer his future into the calm prosperity his family always wanted for themselves. He alone applies the philosophy that your life is what you make of it.

    Judith Umbach

    Graphic Novel Roundup

    by Sonya - 0 Comment(s)

    I occasionally pick up a graphic novel, often memoirs or biographical fiction, and I am rarely disappointed! Here's a brief roundup of some newer releases that I've got my eye on, as well as a few older gems that you might enjoy.

    If you liked Persepolis:

    Unterzakhn by Leela Corman

    It didn't take more than looking at the cover to get this title on my reading list, but a few words from the catalogue's summary just make it sound that much more interesting:

    "A mesmerizing, heartbreaking graphic novel of immigrant life on New York's Lower East Side at the turn of the 20th century, as seen through the eyes of twin sisters whose lives take radically and tragically different paths."

    A friend who's just read it raved about the novel, and the characters that were so real that she read up on the author and the novel to learn about their lives (only to confirm that it's fiction).

    Susceptible by Geneviève Castrée

    This latest release by a young Canadian graphic novelist reads like a memoir, intimate and thoughtful. Read the summary (from our catalogue):

    "Geneviève Castrée has long been beloved for her mini-comics, comics, visual art, and music. There is a unique quality to all of her artistic endeavors: quiet, serene, depressing. Castree's keen eye for detail and her fearless ability to probe the depths of her troubled past make Susceptible a stirring portrait of an artist coming into her own.

    Susceptible is the story of Goglu, a daydreamer growing up in Quebec in the '80s and '90s with a single mother. From a skillful artist comes a moving, beautiful story about families, loss, and growing up. Whether she's discussing nature versus nurture or the story of her birth, Castree imbues her storytelling with a quiet power and a confidence in the strength of imagery."

    A slice of life:

    Building Stories by Chris Ware

    This wonderful assortment of pamphlets, mini-comics in paperback form, posters, hardcover graphic novels and other media comes in a big box. Among all the items included in the box, we learn the life stories, woes and preoccupations of the tenants in one apartment building. A truly unique format that enlivens the stories it contains!

    Aya: Love in Yop City by Marguerite Abouet

    I can't wait to read this next installment in the series about Aya. Set in Ivory Coast in the 1970s, the tone is light and easy, telling the stories of the daily lives of Aya and her circle of friends, neighbours and acquaintances. If you're new to this series, you should read them in order: start with Aya, then Aya of Yop City, then Aya: the secrets come out.

    From the catalogue summary:

    "Aya: Love in Yop City comprises the final three chapters of the Aya story, episodes never before seen in English. Aya is a lighthearted story about life in the Ivory Coast during the 1970s, a particularly thriving and wealthy time in the country's history. While the stories found in Aya: Love in Yop City maintain their familiar tone, quick pace, and joyfulness, we see Aya and her friends beginning to make serious decisions about their future.

    This second volume of the complete Aya includes unique appendices & recipes, guides to understanding Ivorian slang, street sketches, and concluding remarks from Marguerite Abouet explaining history and social milieu. Inspired by Abouet's childhood, the series has received praise for offering relief from the disaster-struck focus of most stories set in Africa."


    Fantastical fiction:

    Habibi by Craig Thompson

    This epic story reads like a timeless fairy tale, and the sumptuous visuals will mesmerize and enchant you! I've previously posted a review, here, but since I was so taken with the book, I couldn't resist adding it to this list. For me, this easily takes a place in my "must reads."

    Tales from Outer Suburbia by Shaun Tan

    This author is one of my favourites, although my first encounter with his work was The Arrival, a gorgeous, wordless tale of moving to a new land. Tales from Outer Suburbia, on the other side of the "words-versus-pictures" graphic novel continuum, is more like a collection of quirky, illustrated short stories. The stories and illustrations are charming and eccentric, perfect for a rainy afternoon spent in a cozy spot.

    From our catalogue summary:

    "Breathtakingly illustrated and hauntingly written, Tales from Outer Suburbia is by turns hilarious and poignant, perceptive and goofy. Through a series of captivating and sophisticated illustrated stories, Tan explores the precious strangeness of our existence. He gives us a portrait of modern suburban existence filtered through a wickedly Monty Pythonesque lens. Whether it's discovering that the world really does stop at the end of the city's map book, or a family's lesson in tolerance through an alien cultural exchange student, Tan's deft, sweet social satire brings us face-to-face with the humor and absurdity of modern life."

    Royal Doom

    by Jasna - 0 Comment(s)

    What did Empress Wang, Anula and Brunhilda have in common?

    Never heard of them?

    Let’s try this: What did Anne Boleyn, Marie Antoinette and Jane Grey have in common?

    Aha, you got it…

    The first three queens were burned to death; the last three were beheaded. The common denominator for all six of them, and a few more dozens throughout history – their deaths were as premature as they were violent.

    In her book Doomed Queens: Royal Women Who Met Bad Ends, from Cleopatra to Princess Di, Kris Waldherr presents about fifty too-brief lives of queens across the ages, from the ancient times of Athaliah, a biblical queen and the daughter of King Ahad and Queen Jesabel, and Olimpias, Alexander the Great’s mother, through the Dark and Middle ages and Tudor times, when the position of the queen to Henry WIII, as we know, carried a significant risk, to the French Revolution and its famous royal victims, to the doomed queens of our days…

    Some quotes attributed to the above mentioned beheaded queens:

    “A queen who is not regent ought, under these circumstances, to remain passive and prepare to die.” ~Marie Antoinette

    “The executioner shall not have much trouble, for I have a little neck.” ~Anne Boleyn

    “I assure you, the time hath been so odious to me that I long for nothing so much as death.” ~Jane Grey

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