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    Book Club in a Bag

    The Light and the Heavy… of Comics

    by Adrienne - 0 Comment(s)

    Think a comic doesn’t have the weight to deal with some heavy issues? Carry the idea that comics are just for boys and never deal with relationships? In fact it can be a light way to highlight and inform you without weighing you down and turning you off. They might even make you laugh… and cry and want to throw the book across the room. (We here at the library do NOT advocate this action, just saying).

    Try these on for size:

    Fat Free by Jude Miller & Illustrated by Mary Wilshire – “The Amazing All True Adventures of Supersize Woman! “ Memoir of one woman’s journey to self-esteem and fat acceptance and fitness. This book probes cultural questions and doesn’t hide truths or contradictions nor promote the fat phobia that is so pervasive in our culture. For instance, the story shows how we can often help others when we still need help ourselves and that often we can change our mind and redefine what recovery and health are as we go along.

    Yakuza Moon by Shoko Tendo (adapted Sean Michael Wilson by illustrated by Michiru Morikawa). The true memoirs of a gangster's daughter illustrates how significant rites of passage, such as getting a full body tattoo, can empower us to make life altering positive changes in our lives. As well as being a gripping fast-paced read this story shows human strength of spirit and honesty. Shoko says that “Getting tattooed, from the base of her neck to the tips of her toes, with a design centered on a geisha with a dagger in her mouth, was an act that empowered her to start making changes in her life. She quit her job as a hostess. On her last day at the bar she looked up at the full moon, a sight she never forgot. The moon became a symbol of her struggle to become whole, and the title of the book is an epitaph for herself and her family.” Tendo has also written a full length memoir continuing the story of her recovery on to include the birth of her daughter.

    Dragonslippers (This is What an Abusive Relationship Looks Like) by Rosalind Penfold. This graphic novel is actually pretty accurate in depicting how twisted emotional manipulation can be. No surprise since it’s actually Penfold’s memoir and based on her real life. If you’ve ever wondered or had a friend in this situation I would highly recommend this book but it DOES come with a trigger warning. On the plus side it also shows how Penfold managed to leave and recover.

    And on the lighter but no less relevant side:

    The Cute Girl Network by Greg Means/MK Reed and illustrated by Joe Flood. A fun book about 20-somethings, dating and following your own impressions of people rather than stereotypes, gossip and peer pressure.

    My Most Secret Desire by Julie Doucet. Julie is the queen hipster girl from Montreal who originally got me into comic books… way back in art school, perhaps actually because she writes about being in art school. Dark and funny, this lady pulls no punches in detailing her life as a punk growing up in Montreal through art school and various boyfriends. I briefly forgot that Doucet first converted me to comics years ago with HER tales of adventures and misadventures. It’s been an on again off again relationship. ;)

    Edmund and Rosemary Go To Hell by Bruce Eric Kaplan. Last but not least this comic is a fun, uplifting, simple fast read. It is satirical take on modern living, our search for meaning and a journey into appreciating the good things we have in life.

    For more great comic books check out my previous posts Great graphix: Not Your run of the Mill cominc Books and Words in Beige.

    Your Fall Reading List

    by Sonya - 0 Comment(s)

    First, a couple of suggestions:

    Once the dust settles from your fall return to routines, you might find yourself looking for something to read. I'll start you off with a few recommendations that are on MY list:

    Louise Penny: The Long Way Home

    This 10th installment in Penny's fabulous Inspector Gamache mystery series is one I'm eagerly awaiting! The scheduled publication date was August 26, so get your name on the hold list if you're already a fan. If you haven't read this series, start at the beginning with Still Life. Penny's novels are perfect for curling up with on a crisp fall day. You'll get to know the tiny Quebec town of Three Pines and its eccentric and realistically drawn inhabitants. Throughout the series, these characters will feel like old friends, and I was thrilled to discover that there would be a tenth title! Although it is a mystery series, you don't have to be a dedicated mystery reader to enjoy these novels, which will also appeal to fans of Canadian fiction who enjoy strong characters and a vivid sense of place.

     

    Jessie Burton: The Miniaturist

    I've always loved discovering new authors through debut novels. Just think of how difficult it is to get published with a first novel these days--having positive reviews for a debut novel is a sure sign of quality! This title caught my eye based on its summary in the catalogue:

    Enchanting, beautifully written, and exquisitely suspenseful, The Miniaturist is a magnificent story of love and obsession, betrayal and retribution, appearance and truth.

     

    Did you know?

    You can sign up to receive a monthly (or bimonthly) list of new and recommended titles in your preferred reading genre with our Next Reads newsletters. If you like booklists but don't want to clutter up your inbox, you can still read the back issues! It's just one more of the great features you'll find on our website.

    Speaking of great features, you can find NoveList Plus content, including read-alike recommendations and reviews, in the catalogue. Don't miss out on the full NoveList Plus database in your E-Library under Reading & eBooks.

    And that's not all...

    Here are some more fall reading lists from around the web: