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The Skills to Pay the Bills

by Tomas - 0 Comment(s)

youth hiring fair

Looking for a summer job?

The City of Calgary Youth Employment Centre is hosting its 16th Annual Youth Hiring Fair on Tuesday, April 8th. Over 5,000 youth between the ages of 15-24 are expected to attend this event, representing a variety of skill and educational levels, and there will be more than 80 employers who are looking to hire YOU! The Centre has a great website, www.nextsteps.org, including videos with advice on what to expect, how to dress, and how to prepare for the fair.

If you can't make it to the hiring fair, don't worry! The library has lots of great resources to help you with your career:

  • Friday April 11th, join us for Summer Jobs: Opportunities and Options. The Youth Employment Centre will lead a discussion on summer job strategies, with special guests from Calaway Park, The City of Calgary Recreation Department and Canada Safeway.
  • On Saturday April 26, the Calgary Public Library hosts: Accelerate Your Career: Career Conversations, an event specifically for youth aged 13 and up, where you can meet one-on-one with a wide range of professionals.
  • Beyond this one-day event, the library offers group programs and one-on-one assistance in building resumes and cover letters, and Interview skills. take a look at all the offerings available here.
  • You can also find a lot of great resources through our E-library, including resume building, job searching and more.
  • If you're considering college or university, the Crowfoot Library is hosting a Post-Secondary Prep night on May 8th, where you can connect with representatives from Mount Royal University, SAIT, ACAD, Bow Valley College, and the U of C. It's rare to get them all in the same room so this is a great opportunity to check out your options!
  • Volunteering is another way to and to explore a variety of professional fields and to build skills and experience. Propellus (formerly Volunteer Calgary) has a number of great opportunities to explore. If you are in Grade 7 or higher, there are a lot of opportunities available at the Calgary Public Library. Check out Monique's post for some good links and tips.

Good luck!

Tabletop Day at CPL

by Carrie - 0 Comment(s)

tabletop day

You may not know this, but I have a deep and abiding love for tabletop strategy games. The addiction started years ago with Settlers of Catan, but has grown (and grown) to include so many other great games - immersive, hours-long games like Dominion, Talisman, and Hacienda; quick, humourous games like Poo, Zombie Dice, and Get Bit; beautiful meditative games like Tsuro - honestly, there's almost nothing I won't play.

Which is why I'm so happy to announce that we will once again be celebrating International Tabletop Day at Calgary Public Library! All ages are welcome and you don't need to register - just drop in and play something awesome.

You can join us at four locations on April 5th, from 12-4 pm:

  • Central Library (on the 2nd floor - that's where I'll be!) - 616 Macleod Trail SE
  • Forest Lawn Library - 4807 8th Avenue SE
  • Shawnessy Library - 333 Shawville Blvd. SE (South Fish Creek Complex)
  • Village Square Library - 2623 56th Street NE

And if you just can't wait that long, come to the Nose Hill Library (1530 Northmount Drive NW) for an early celebration on March 30th from 1-4 pm.

Neil Gaiman's Visit to Calgary

by Emily - 0 Comment(s)

At the end of February, Calgary had the great pleasure of getting a visit from one of our favourite authors, Neil Gaiman. While Neil was here he taught a master class for students in the English graduate program at the University of Calgary and also gave a reading, as the 2014 Distinguished Visiting Writer for the Calgary Distinguished Writers Program (CDWP), that was free for the public to attend.

I was lucky enough to get to attend the private reception for Neil before his reading and decided to conduct an eccentric interview with him, using post-it notes, for filling Station magazine where I volunteer.

I decided I should also get him to answer a post-it note question for the teen blog. If you're looking for some recent Neil Gaiman books to read check out Unnatural Creatures and The Silver Dream.

Image of Post it note with question and an answer by Neil Gaiman

Youth Read Remixed - Teen Art Contest

by Carrie - 0 Comment(s)

Remix the Youth Read mascot and you could win some great prizes!

Youth Read, our epic summer reading program for teens, starts in just 95 days (yes, I'm already counting down)! If you took part last year, you probably remember George the Unicorn:

george lifting weights george gift fiery george
i'm a treasure george reading george trophy

For this year's program, we want to give George a bit of a makeover, and that's where you come in. Just grab the .jpg template below (or click here for the photoshop file), and draw any new poses, costumes, or accessories you like. We want you to get creative, and as you can see from the examples above, it's ok to get a little weird...

The Rules:

  • We'll be awarding points for creativity and for how well your new version fits George's style
  • Digital or hand drawn art are fine; hand drawn art should be scanned, not photographed (visit your local library if you need a scanner)
  • Send your file as a .jpg, .png, or .psd
  • Enter as many times as you like
  • Send all entries to teenservices@calgarypubliclibrary.com by March 30, 2014.
  • Disclaimer: By entering this contest, you agree that you and your parent/guardian give consent for your work to be posted on the CPL website and used to promote Youth Read. Entries may be edited or altered as needed. You also agree that all work submitted, apart from the basic unicorn template, is your own original work.

The Prizes:

We have great YA books, artist prize packs, and gift cards up for grabs and no limit on the number of winners - anyone whose art we use will win.

plain george

Send all entries to teenservices@calgarypubliclibrary.com by March 30, 2014.

Youth SLAM!

by Emily - 3 Comment(s)

calgary spoken word festivalDo you have what it takes to belt your poems out on the mic? If so you should definitely sign up for Youth Slam, the Calgary Spoken Word Festival's event for teens under the age of 19. In order to compete you need to bring 3 poems, no longer than 3 minutes each. You may not get to perform them all, but bring them just in case you make it through all three rounds. You could have a chance to win the grand prize: $150!

Maybe you love poetry, but you're not quite sure that you're brave enough to read just yet. No worries! Why not come and be a part of the audience? Part of the poet's score is based on audience reaction, so make sure to come out and support your favourite poets!

Event Details:

Saturday, April 05 - 11:00 AM - Free

The Central Library – John Dutton Theatre – 616 Macleod Trail SE

Calling All Volunteers

by Monique - 0 Comment(s)

Need volunteer hours? Looking for somewhere to volunteer? Looking for something to boost your resume or school portfolio? We have the solution for you! Not only is it a rewarding feeling to know that you have helped someone learn something new, or improve on a skill, but it provides you with an opportunity to learn and grow as well. Gather a couple of friends and volunteer together; not only will you gain some valuable experience, you can have fun doing it.

If you are in grades 7 to 12, we have several great volunteering opportunities at any of our 18 branches: Computer Buddies, Cyber Seniors Connect, ESL Teen Talk, Reading Buddies, and Curious, the Library Mascot. Interested in volunteering at a specific branch? Check out our current opportunities. If you are looking for more information about volunteering at the library, check out our volunteer blog. If you are interested, fill out an application form online or drop by any of the eighteen branches to get an application form.

Our Freedom to Read Contest Winners

by Carrie - 0 Comment(s)

book locked upFreedom to Read Week is nearly over, and as a final note, we wanted to share the winning entries in our writing contest. We are always impressed with the creativity and insight shown by the students, and this year, the choice was just as difficult as always. In the end, we chose two essays and a poem that we hope will make you reflect on this freedom that we all too often take for granted. Without further ado, here are the winning entries:

Freedom by Emily G.

Freedom. Seven ordinary letters come together to form an extraordinary word. It is something many of us in North America take for granted, but many people in other countries around the world will go to tremendous lengths to obtain freedom. Take for example the story of 15-year-old, Malala Yousafzai and her struggle for education. Anyone will tell you that the foundation of education is literacy, and literacy comes from reading.

Reading is not limited just to books however. All sorts of media fall under this category. Newspapers in particular have always been a very influential form of expression, especially during the American Revolution. Newspapers offered a platform to share ideas about politics and military strategies, and they were also a way to rebel against the government itself.

During the Second World War, the freedom to read was often challenged. Any book written by a Jew of an enemy of the Nazis was burned publicly, biasedly filtering the content that children learned. In Canada today, we have an enormous number of choices when it comes to what to read: Chaucer, Tolstoy, Lewis, and Rowling to name a few popular authors, and an endless array of different genres as well. If our freedom to choose the books we read was limited, our perception would narrow along with our entire understanding of literature and the world.

Although it may seem unrelated, picture for a moment your plate at the supper table. Roast beef, potatoes with gravy, and a fresh garden salad. Each of these foods and their respective groups are vital to a balanced diet and a healthy body. Take away any of these and you’ll become moody and lethargic. The same is true with literature; take away the variety and you are left with an entire nation ignorant of the broad spectrum of learning and the immense pleasure of reading. Take away our freedom, and you injure our minds.

A New Chapter: A New World by Rachel H.

Every swish of a flipping page welcomes a fresh chapter of your life; a fresh chapter brimming with greater amounts of knowledge and a stronger understanding of the world around you than you had previously thought was obtainable. Literature is the word that plants the seeds of success and opens our eyes to the world, fostering a greater understanding of far away lands and cultures.

As stated in Harper Lee’s novel To Kill a Mockingbird, “You will never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view...until you climb inside his skin and walk around in it.” Literature provides the means to view the world through the eyes of the author and may provide information about other cultures which can build bonds between citizens around the globe. By allowing your mind to indulge in novels such as the Breadwinner Trilogy, you can truly comprehend the hardships endured by the citizens of war-torn countries. Instilling empathy into the citizens of the world by means of literature is the only way to establish peace among all of humanity.

Literature is the key that will open the door to world peace and understanding, yet governments and religious institutions around the globe still believe that it is appropriate to ban novels that are perceived to show political or cultural demerits. You must not hesitate to raise your voice against literacy bans because without the universal freedom to obtain any novel that we desire, how can we expect to truly understand each other and create worldwide harmony which will benefit us all?

Within Books by Jasmine Y.

Forward eleven years,
You might find a graveyard,
Burrowed in our mistakes,
Intense scientific nightmares,
Come adrift near our blackout,
Perhaps destiny has led us so,
But more-so, our questionable choices,
Slammed into a soulless shed.

Like the strong feet of the elephant,
Push into our selves,
Passive but stable,
There, concealed in our hearts,
Brave quotes that give life a boost,
Wise thoughts to shy away from doom.

As an infant,
So much stronger,
So fearless,
We march upon the bridge,
Connected to our inside world,
Only needing protection,
Against the outside world.

Without those creatures,
The parallel worlds of you and I,
The glorifying princes,
That await your arrival,
No doubt,
Would our minds be sucked,
Into an army of ten thousand men.

Can you feel my lungs?
Pounding with the liberation,
The colourful life we could give,
Planning a feast of words to the children,
Giving a stick to the frail,
Creating insight into another's mind,
And sharing our stories,
Woven into a thread of past.

Celebrate Freedom to Read Week with us!

by Carrie - 0 Comment(s)

Three great ways to celebrate Freedom to Read Week:

eleanor & park

1. Read Eleanor & Park (or any other challenged book)

This morning, members of the Calgary Freedom to Read Week Committee presented a copy of Rainbow Rowell's Eleanor & Park to City Council as part of the official launch of Freedom to Read Week 2014. Eleanor & Park is a bestselling and award-winning novel about two teenage misfits falling in love in 1980s Omaha, and it was the centre of controversy in Minnesota this past summer when two parents objected to the book's use of language. The author's planned visit to the school was cancelled, and the ultra-conservative Parents Action League got involved, demanding that all copies of the book be removed from both the school and public libraries, and that the librarians who had chosen the book for the summer reading program be disciplined for choosing to offer this "inappropriate and profane" book (their words, not mine!). Fortunately, cooler heads prevailed.

2. Join us this Thursday at Owl's Nest Books

Every year, the Calgary Freedom to Read Week Committee recognizes the winners of our teen writing contest, and also presents the Freedom of Expression award to a Calgarian who exemplifies the fight for intellectual freedom. This year, they are presenting the award to local radio personality Dave Rutherford.

The celebration is at Owl's Nest Books (815A 49th Avenue SW, in the Britannia shopping plaza) on Thursday, February 27th, at 7 p.m.

3. Read the winning entries in our Freedom to Read Week writing contest!

The sad truth is, material for kids and teens is the most likely to be challenged, which makes YOU the victim of censorship. Every year CPL hosts a writing contest for local students, and as always, this year's winners impressed us with their responses.

Our 2014 winners are Jasmine Y., Rachel H., and Emily G., and we'll post their entries at the end of the week — so if you want to hear them earlier, you'll have to join us at Owl's Nest.

Great Graphix for 2014—Bleak, Bizarre and Beautiful continued

by Adrienne - 0 Comment(s)

It may be a bit early to think of this year's Comic Con coming up in April however Camilla d'Errico's 2nd volume of Tanpopo is just hitting the stacks sooo... I thought it might be appropriate to highlight some great new and old additions to the fabulous Teen Graphix collection we have. Tanpopo is a 3 volume story of a girl raised by a machine-driven mind prison, who frees herself and goes on a journey of emotional and intellectual self discovery guided by a "boy" who is either a devil or trickster character or both. D'Erricco uses text from Goethe's "Faust"(and it is a Faustian journey that Tanpopo embarks on!!), Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" and Strange Stories from a Chinese Studio by Liaozhai Zhiyi.

Goethe started writing Faust when he was 19 and finished it a week before his death - how's that for the work of your life? Camilla uses the text and re-contextualizes it to create her own poetic story, complete with her sparse but beautiful comic illustrations all rendered with a fine point acrylic brush. Hailing from Vancouver d'Erricco has also published a YA graphic novel called Burn and several books of her art. One of which I just happened to get hand autographed with a drawing of her own when I met her at last year's Comic Con. (I'm sure she'll do the same for you if you go this year, nudge, nudge), she is, generous like that, and cool; hence me being so excited about her latest release. Did I mention that she snowboards and makes her art into designs for cell phone skins, laptops, snowboards, dresses, leggings, chairs, wallets, make-up cases and toys for the likes of Haysbor, Disney, Tokyopop, Neil Gaiman and the ilk. Her HelmetHeads paintings have a sweet pop sensibility to them. She's even published a book about how to emulate the same in your own comics. This could perhaps... hint, hint... be used as an inspiration to submit a comic of your own to our TeensCreate page, just sayin'....

Speaking of literary pop sensibilities; did you know that Frank L. Baum actually wrote not just 1 but 11 OZ novels? And not all starting in Kansas... Eric Shanower and artist Skottie Young have turned them into a series of great graphic novels for your eyes to enjoy. I think perhaps in an alternate universe D'Erricco's Tanpopo and Skottie Young's Dorothy and Ozma could all be sisters. The wonders of OZ never cease ;p

To conclude our brief but delectable journey, a great version of Faust has just been republished and acquired here at CPL. The illustrations by Harry Clarke hail from the Art Nouveau era (think Aubrey Beardsley) creating a visual feast that rivals the Steampunky details of d'Errico's HelmetHeads. So if you like Tanpopo you just might enjoy. Happy Reading!

 

The 5th Annual Prom Dress Extravaganza!

by Emily - 0 Comment(s)

Prom season is upon us again and the library wants to help you find the perfect dress for a memorable evening with your friends! Drop by our participating locations to browse the dresses we have and why not tell your friends so you can make a girls' day of it? There will be a number of talented, volunteer designers on hand to help you find the perfect fit, or feel free to bring a dress you already own and our volunteers will be happy to lend their expertise to resize or update it for you.

This event will be held at the following libraries:

Forest Lawn Library: Saturday, March 1, 1-3:30 p.m.

Southwood Library: Saturday, March 8, 2-5 p.m.

Village Square Library: Saturday, March 15, 1-3:30 p.m.

 

Even if your own prom is past, your party dress can still do some good — we are happy to accept donations of gently used formal wear at any library location!

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