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by Alexandra - 0 Comment(s)

pages staffYou always knew your Calgary Public Library card got you wicked stuff IN the library (free books, free programs, free homework help, free music, free space...) but just the other day we found out about an awesome deal your card will get you OUTSIDE the library too!

Pages on Kensington offers a 10% discount off books to any teen who shows their Library Card at time of purchase! That's ANY book, with ANY CPL Teen Library Card! We understand that sometimes you just can't wait for 400 people to finish reading the hottest title before you get your hands on it, or that sometimes you love a book so much you just HAVE to have your own copy... when those times hit, head over to Pages!

And if you're confused about the part where we said "ANY Teen Library Card", that's probably because you didn't know we now offer several different styles of cards, not to mention the chance to customize your own from photos or artwork (for a pretty penny, but could you ASK for a better cause?)! The best deal in town just got even better!

 

 

 

The boys from Pages love their ya lit!


Read Across Canada - Manitoba

by Monique - 0 Comment(s)

We've now made it to Manitoba, it wasn't so bad getting here, right? Let's look at 2 authors from Manitoba.

Margaret Buffie was born and raised in Winnipeg and graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Manitoba. Once she had graduated, she began working as an illustrator for the Hudson's Bay Company. She eventually obtained her teaching certificate in 1976. She began her writing career in 1985. A year later, she completed her first manuscript and submitted it for publication, Who is Frances Rain? It became a best seller after it was published in 1987. Since then, she has gone on to write numerous critically acclaimed novels for young adults, including My Mother's Ghost, The Watcher's Quest series, The Dark Garden, and Angels turn their backs and Out of Focus. Depending on the time of year, will depend on where she spends her time writing. During the winter months, she is at her home in Winnipeg and during the summer months, she writes at her cottage in Northwestern Ontario. Margaret has been the recipient of the prestigious Vicky Metcalk Award for Body of Work, The Young Adult Canadian Book Award, the McNally Robinson Book for Young People award and many other awards and honours.

In Who is Frances Rain?, Lizzie used to look forward to vacationing at her grandmother's cabin. That is until this summer, when the entire family is joining her, including her stepfather, whom she dislikes. In order to get away from her families bickering, Lizzie explores an island that is nearby. It is during her exploring, she finds an abandoned cabin and finds a pair of glasses. She tries them on and finds herself watching a woman and a girl. Lizzie has to find out who they are and why they are appearing to her, will she be successful?

Carol Matas lives in Winnipeg. She has written more than forty books for kids, teens and young adults. Her works have been translated into Spanish, Catalan, Japanese, Taiwanese, Turkish, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Finnish, Norwegian, German, French, Indonesian, Bulgarian and Russian. Her works have won several awards including Sydney Taylor Award, Geoffrey Bilson Award, Silver Birch Award, Canadian Jewish Book Award, as well as being nominated for the Governor General's Award twice. Carol began to write historical fiction when her Danish husband would tell her stories about his parents' experiences fighting the Nazis during World War II. She also writes contemporary, science fiction and fantasy novels as well. Some of her works include : Far, Visions, Jesper, Daniel's Story, The Whirlwind, Lisa's War, Tales of a Reluctant Psychic, and In My Enemy's House.


In In My Enemy's House, the Nazis are ready to move any remaining Jewish people in Marrisa's town into the ghetto. Marissa, who doesn't know if her family is dead or alive as they are now all scattered, gets hold of a Polish girl's papers and makes her way to Germany to try and survive as a Polish worker. One gains a new perspective on the nature of good and evil as you delve into Marissa's dilemma as a Jewish person living a lie in order to survive. Will Marissa be able to convince people that she is Polish and leave behind her Jewish roots?

Now it's time to hit the road again and make our way to Ontario.

YAC Reviews: The Laura Line

by Carrie - 0 Comment(s)

yac reviews

the laura lineThe Laura Line by Crystal Allen

Review by Vyoma

This was a very relatable and notable book. The adventures of Laura Dyson and her struggle for acceptance by her classmates show cases her strong personality. I loved reading this book because of its sporadic humor, its sense of belonging, and its imagery. By the end of the book, Laura Dyson felt like a friend rather than a character in a book. The innumerable details about Laura’s surroundings and the process of making significant decisions show that an individual should never be ashamed of his/her family’s background. Embarrassed to show anyone the “slave shack”, Laura attempts to cancel her class’s field trip. After finally entering the shack, she finds so many wonderful things about it and her ancestors. One silly mistake ruins a priceless item – a legendary little chair. On the verge of breaking strong friendship and her already poor relationship with her classmates, Laura is absolutely stuck. Through patience, cajoling, and being laconic, Laura finally makes important decisions.

YA Lit Pick - September

by Monique - 0 Comment(s)

Cover Art for I am the wallpaper

Looking for that next great read? Check out I am the Wallpaper by Peter Mark Hughes. 13-year-old Floey Parker is tired of blending into the background, living in the shadow of her older and more popular sister Lillian. With her sister getting married and heading off on her month long honeymoon, Floey decides it is time for a change — time to become someone she normally would not be. She is going to get noticed, no matter what it takes. Some things don't go as planned, due to Floey's younger cousins Tish and Richard, who happen to throw a wrench into her plans. It doesn't help that her mom expects her to spend time with them during their stay. Will Floey survive her cousins' antics? Will she get noticed for all the right reasons?


Although the author is male, he has done a great job of portraying a female main character who is discovering herself. There were times where I found myself wishing it would move along, yet cheering her on during her quest in finding her true self.

Points of Departure, pt 2

by Tomas - 0 Comment(s)

How do you find somewhere that is figuratively in the middle of nowhere? Even worse, what if the place in question is also literally nowhere, except in the pages of the book?

MontanaAs Easy As Falling Off the Face of the Earth, by Charlotte Perkins is a comically disastrous travelogue. The journey kicks off in the town of New Pêche, where 16 year old Ry - on his way to summer camp- arrives after mistakenly getting off the train in the middle of the Montana wilderness, setting off an escalating series of travel misadventures.

I scoured the map, but couldn’t see any town in Montana by that name. Perkins' observation that Pêche is French for Peach is a red herring, as further sleuthing revealed that it’s also French for fishing. And there IS a town called Whitefish in Montana….

Henry River Mill VillageSearching for places gets a bit trickier in speculative fiction. Place names, and sometimes even the geography, can change, but these locations can still be teased out.

District 12 of The Hunger Games is located somewhere in the Appalachian region of what is currently the United States. In the film versions, a full-scale version of the district was created in Henry River Mill Creek, North Carolina. Like Harry Potter, this has resulted in an adjunct tourism industry, complete with tours and camps (I don’t know that this would be my idea of a relaxing vacation). If you’re really keen you can even buy it!

Ship breaking

The New Orleans described in Ship Breaker is, to date, a far cry from the city as it exists now. The hulking shells of freighters that fill the shoreline can be found in other locales, however. A landscape that author Paolo Bacigalupi may have envisioned currently exists in Chittagong, Bangladesh and was documented in a stunning series by photographer Edward Burtynsky.

MoonThe precise terrestrial location of Zone Seven in the tyrannical 'Mother Land' is left vague in Sally Gardner's Maggot Moon. The lunar landscape, on the other hand, is described in vivid detail as the regime celebrates the imminent moon landing. The fate of this landing and those of Standish and his friend Hector become increasingly intertwined in this tense and heartbreaking book.

As easy as falling off the face of the earthCatching FireShip BreakerMaggot Moon

Cram Your Summer Reading In Now

by Alexandra - 0 Comment(s)

Photo Credit: http://www.etsy.com/listing/35063991/books-printI love books. I love ALL books. I love ancient books and new books and bad books and blue books. I love classics, adaptations, translations, blatant rip-offs, movie novelizations, and sometimes even pure, awful, fan-fic-y drivel.

There is nothing I love more than getting my hands on a book I've never read before...

But no, wait... that's a lie. Because there IS something I love more than a new book.

An OLD book. A book that I've already loved. A lot. And I don't mean like... "I read that book ages ago and can't remember the plot, I should read it again". I mean like "I-have-read-this-book-so-many-times-the-words-come-easier-to-me-than-breathing". Like "I-am-reading-the-words-in-my-minds-eye-before-my-real-eye-even-gets-to-them-on-the-page". Like "Move over, J.K. Rowling, I've got this ish on lock!"

And yes, as you can imagine, there are some pretty touchy-feely reasons for doing it. Every July 1st (since 1998) I have sat down to the comforting words “Mr. and Mrs. Dursley, of number four, Privet Drive, were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much” and this wave of pure nostalgic happiness washes over me… like getting a massive bear hug from an old friend (the twirly kind where your legs dangle in the air) and it’s just… bliss. And it’s true, I DO find something new that I’ve never noticed before each time I read an old favourite. For example, this past July when I read that “the Weasley twins were punished for bewitching several snowballs so that they followed Quirrell around, bouncing off the back of his turban”, what I realized for the first time ever was that Fred and George WERE THROWING SNOWBALLS AT VOLDEMORT’S FACE and it’s a miracle that they weren’t Avada Kedavra’d on the spot.



So yes, I have a set list of favourites that I re-read EVERY summer (all 7 HP’s, The Hobbit, The LOTR Trilogy, and 3 different Tamora Pierce Quartets; Allana, Daine and Kel), and have since I was about 11 years old, and I don’t even feel a little bit weird or guilty or childish about it. Here’s why:

It’s good for your Brain. Your brain needs the chance to relax after a whole year of cramming during school. You need a certain amount of vegging-out so that you can start… vegging-IN, come September. But you also can’t just do NOTHING all summer… you’ll get Brain Drain, and start using double negatives in your sentences or something outrageous like that! Best thing to do? Exercise those synaptic connections by picking up a book you know you love: it might not be challenging, per se, but it's working out all the right muscles and keeping the cogs turning. And then you won't have to worry about regressing a grade level or anything horrifying like that.

It's good for your Body. Re-reading comes with some surprising health benefits that are linked to our emotional releases and sense of well-being. It's theraputic. And before anyone asks, no, that is not a picture of me in that first article... EVERYONE loves HP.

It's good for your Soul. Hot on the heels of me saying how much I love ALL books, I also have to speak to the utter power of curriculum-required, school-assigned readings to crush your soul. It's summer! Read what you want! Read WHATEVER you want. If that means forgoing "Ender's Game" (and just waiting for the movie) or postponing the latest George R.R. Martin in favour of picking up Percy Jackson one more time, just do it! Life is too short to read bad books. Enjoy your free time will while you have it!

Also... a lot of really successful people do it. A lot of super smart people testify to the importance of re-reading favourite books. That’s how you know it’s a good idea.

So here's my recommendation: Spend some time this summer with well-loved favourites. You'll thank yourself (and ME!) for it.

Teen Book Clubs

by Christine A - 0 Comment(s)

Are you a true book lover and would like to discuss your passion with like-minded teens? Starting Wed. August 21st you can sign up for one of our book clubs. All you need is your library card!

For ages 10-14:

Alexander Calhoun
Saturdays, Sept. 21, Oct. 19, Nov. 16, and Dec. 14
2 - 3 p.m.

Nose Hill
Tuesdays, Oct. 22, Nov. 19, and Dec. 17
7 - 8 p.m.

Village Square
Wednesdays, Sept. 18, Oct. 16, Nov. 20, and Dec. 18
7 - 8 p.m.

Signal Hill
Tuesdays, Sept. 24, Oct. 22, Nov. 12, and Dec. 10
7 - 8 p.m.

For ages 13-17:

Fish Creek
Sundays, Sept. 22, Oct. 20, Nov. 17, and Dec. 15
2 - 3 p.m.

Nose Hill
Tuesdays, Sept. 24, Oct. 29, and Nov. 26
7 - 8 p.m.

Roaring Twenties Reads: Vixen and Bright Young Things

by Emily - 0 Comment(s)

If it’s the fashion and style of the prohibition era that fascinates you, the juicy gossip whispered beneath jazz music, or romance sparking at a speakeasy, then this week’s books are meant for you. For all those who are fans of Gossip Girl, or The Luxe, I’ve got you covered. Play some Caravan Palace in the background to get a real 20's atmosphere going!

Anna Godbersen’s Bright Young Things, the first in the Bright Young Things series, follows Letty Larkspur and Cordelia Grey as they flee from their mundane small-town lives to New York. Letty feels she’s destined to find fame in the big city, while Cordelia believes a gangster living there and sharing her last name may be the father she’s never known. Cordelia soon comes to know and trust Astrid Donal, a wealthy, eccentric flapper, but delving into a world of crime and intrigue brings danger, and perhaps even murder!

Vixen, the first book of Jillian Larkin’s series The Flappers, follows the lives of Gloria Carmody, Clara Knowles, and Lorraine Dyer. Gloria is the daughter of a prestigious family, and her engagement to Sebastian Grey means her future is secure, but the thrill of becoming a flapper is too much to let go of. Her needy best friend Lorraine has become jealous of Clara: to what extreme actions will her jealousy drive her? Clara is Gloria’s cousin, sent to live with them due to a dubious past that she’s determined to erase. The lives of all three become intertwined while the jazz music of the speakeasies howls in the background.

The Fresh Prince of B612

by Tomas - 0 Comment(s)

The Little PrinceThe new little prince

Recently I found out about a new version of The Little Prince, the classic story by Antoine De Saint-Exupéry.The Little Prince: The New Adventures is a graphic novel series which, it is prominently stressed in the promotions, is approved by the Estate of Saint-Exupéry and is in the spirit of the original. A new cartoon has also been produced, currently playing at Calaway Park in their new Cinemagic 3D feature. Both have been developed with the noble goal of bringing this classic character into the 21st Century.

I have to admit, I don't know how I feel about this. No, actually, I DO know that how I feel -strongly- is that this is all kinds of wrong. I've already had part of my childhood ruined by the Star Wars prequels (help me J.J. Abrams, you're my only hope!), and Michael Bay's take on Transformers, so admittedly I'm a little sensitive on the topic... I thought if there was one unassailable territory of my childhood it would be guarded by The Little Prince.

In the new adventures, the Prince and his plucky sidekick, Fox (really?) go from planet to planet, stopping the base villian Snake and his gang of Gloomies (REALLY!?!?) as they hatch all sorts of dastardly plots. I take issue mainly with the complexity of the characters being reduced to simplistic attributes of either 'good' or 'evil'. Snake being cast as a villian fundamentally changes one of the most complicated and pivotal scenes of the original book, and I'm distressed that anyone who reads it after the new adventures will miss out on debating the motivations and the outcomes of the snake's actions.

But maybe I'm just not thinking about this in the right light... After all, it is introducing the character to a new audience, one that then may come across the original. As Moe has written in another blog, classic stories are regularly revisited and brought up to date for new audiences, sometimes quite well. Putting aside the original source material for a moment, the stories of the new series are actually not that bad, although a bit repetitive, and the artwork is delightful.

So what do you think? Should I just calm down and be more open to this attempt at taking this story into an exciting new direction, or do you think this is a poorly considered capitalization on the original story? Let me know about other revisions of classic stories that have or haven't worked for you.

The Little Princenew little prince 2

Last chance to Win Brandon Sanderson's new book!

by Carrie - 0 Comment(s)

still afloatThe RithmatistStill Afloat

Youth Read is still going strong, and we have a winner for our t-shirt design challenge! All proceeds from Nyssa's excellent design (see left) will go to the library's flood relief efforts. You can buy the shirt here, but it is only available until August 5th so don't dawdle!

Win a signed copy of The Rithmatist!

If you missed last week's interview with bestselling author Brandon Sanderson, be sure to read Part 1 and Part 2 for a chance to win a signed copy of his terrific new YA book, The Rithmatist. We'll be drawing the names of our two lucky winners on Friday, August 9th.

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