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    Things You Can Do With 50,000 Words

    by Phil

    Congratulations to all Wrimotaurs who met their goal this November for National Novel Writing Month. Now that the inner editor is allowed out to play there are a lot of options around town to help take your work to the next level, regardless of what that level may be. Sadly, the library's Writer-in-Residence services are now done for the year. Thank you so much Barb Howard for bringing your expertise to so many Calgary writers.

    For those who can't wait for CPL's 2014 Writer-in-Residence season to start up in September, there are other residencies available in the city. Sara Tilley is available at the U of C's Distinguished Writers Program through to the middle of June. The Alexandra Writers Centre Society will kick off Ashley Little's residency in May. AWCS also offers Manuscript Review Service and tons of writing courses. Another great place to find a little (or a lot) of editing guidance is through the Calgary Association of Freelance Editors (CAFE).

    And then there's us, the library! Year-round, we are the perfect writing headquarters. Bounce your ideas off new friends in the Creative Writing Club. Come down to our famous Writer's Weekend on February 2 (registration opens December 23). And check out all the latest and classic books to keep your writing projects moving forward. Here's a few go-to titles for writers:

    FORMATTING & SUBMITTING YOUR MANUSCRIPT

    A visual guide featuring sample article and book query letters, nonfiction book proposals and novel synopses, exclusive tips from leading agents and editors, expanded and updated information on electronic submissions, invaluable tips for query research and platform building, genre-specific guidelines for children's writers, screenwriters, poets, essayists, and others.

    2014 GUIDE TO SELF-PUBLISHING

    The biggest problem with creating books for authors interested in self-publishing is that most books on the topic are so far out of date after a year that they're no longer of much use. The market book model is perfect for the topic of self-publishing since its annual publication schedule allows us to make important updates in a timely fashion. Not only does the book show you how to publish on your own in the most efficient, cost-effective way possible (including digital-only publishing), but you'll also get insights into creating your own marketing plans and learning how other authors have found success. You'll learn about the different services available, as well as gain access to thousands of listings that detail freelance editors and designers, as well as production facilities that can help you produce your book.

    SELF-EDITING FOR FICTION WRITERS

    Here at last is a book by two professional editors to teach writers the techniques of the editing trade that turn promising manuscripts into published novels and short stories. In this completely revised and updated second edition, Renni Browne and Dave King teach you, the writer, how to apply the editing techniques they have developed to your own work. Chapters on dialogue, exposition, point of view, interior monologue, and other techniques take you through the same processes an expert editor would go through to perfect your manuscript. Each point is illustrated with examples, many drawn from the hundreds of books Browne and King have edited

    WEB DESIGNERS' GUIDE TO WORDPRESS

    Legions of web designers and developers are choosing WordPress for building sites. That's because it's powerful, reliable, flexible, scalable--and more. This book is your complete guide to mastering WordPress theme development, covering everything from installation to leveraging the community and resources to improve your WordPress skills for years to come.

    THE WRITER'S GUIDE TO QUERIES, PITCHES & PROPOSALS

    [...] this book gives writers the tools to achieve a competitive edge and break into a wide range of markets. The second edition has been updated throughout and expanded to cover e-mail pitches, letters of introduction, pitching to international markets, how to pitch agents at conferences, and new markets such as greeting cards. [...] This indispensable resource provides writers with successful approaches to such topics as how to craft a query letter, create a nonfiction or fiction book proposal, approach newspapers with a column or syndication idea, get corporate freelancing jobs, and win a writing grant. Interviews with experts in a variety of fields and dozens of new examples [...] Beginning and experienced writers will find this the perfect one-of-a-kind, desktop reference for developing the market approaches they need to sell their work.

    77 REASONS WHY YOUR BOOK WAS REJECTED

    A straightforward, practical reference for aspiring authors, 77 Reasons Why Your Book Was Rejected details the various reasons why editors and agents reject book ideas and pinpoints the mistakes that writers most often make in their proposals. This is an engaging resource for aspiring writers, delivering insider information on why editors and agents decline books and, more importantly, how to get them to stop passing on yours.

    **All book descriptions lifted from the library catalogue summaries.

    Where the Wrimotaurs Roam

    by Phil - 0 Comment(s)

    The Calgary Wrimotaurs are now officially roaming as National Novel Writing month is upon us. The official Wrimotaur anthem states that Calgary's NaNoWriMo novelists will find their Home, home on the page, Where the verbs and the adjectives play, but as that goal for 50,000 words before December 1 looms heavy and beautiful over our heads, it will become very important to spring away from our fictional worlds and find a second home. A warm, inviting place free from domestic distraction that's quiet enough to get some work done, yet bustling with the life you need to breathe into your novel.

    Oh, give me a home...

    And if this second home also offers an endless selection of material for research and inspiration to keep your plot thickening, well that's a bonus. Oh! Hey! On top of that, why not include the guidance of award-winning Canadian Novelist Lawrence Hill - who just so happens to be appearing at several library branches in early November as part of One Book One Calgary.

    From November 7 to November 10 the library offers 6 opportunities to connect with Lawrence Hill in OBOC Author Talks. Might be nice to hit all six, but if you only go to one, make it this one: a double whammy featuring our 2013 Writer-in-Residence Barb Howard, immediately following our NaNoWriMo "Write-Ins":

    Saturday, November 9, 2:30 to 4 p.m.

    Memorial Park Library

    "From the Authors: Lawrence Hill and Barb Howard"

    Join us for coffee and cake as Lawrence Hill and Writer in Residence Barb Howard discuss the process of writing fiction and the challenges of writing as a way of life. Register.

    Happy Novel Month to All!

    Come Write In

    by Phil - 0 Comment(s)

    It's time to put on those bull horn helmets, stock the cupboards, and pound out 50,000 words. November is National Novel Writing Month, more conveniently known as NaNoWriMo, and we want the library to be your personal headquarters for preparation, research, production, and anything else involved in your process that's allowed in public. 'NaNo' is meant to be a fun, "seat of your pants" approach to creative writing. On November 1, participants begin working toward the goal of writing a 50,000 word novel before the final minute of November 30.

    As we see it, the beauty in NaNoWriMo is threefold:

    1. Creating a regular writing practice
      So many of us struggle to write every day. During NaNoWriMo you write—a lot—every day, helping to create the habit of making the time to write and then actually writing.
    2. Completing a major length writing project
      Will it be your best work? No. Will it get published? Not likely. Will you realize that you can write a novel to completion and learn a whole lot (about yourself and you as a writer) from the process? Yes.
    3. Community Support
      What most consider the most important aspect of NaNoWriMo is the community support. There are websites, international and local online and in-person meet-up groups, support from others who see the fun and folly of writing 50,000 words in thirty days.

    To get ready, the Central library is hosting two pre-NaNo workshops on Saturday, October 26:


    PHENOMENAL PLOTS - 12 NOON

    Discover how to analyze popular stories in order to understand how to get your readers’ hearts pounding and keep them turning pages long past bedtime. Register here.


    CAPTIVATING CHARACTERS - 2 PM

    Learn and share tips with your fellow writers. We’ve all read characters we couldn’t stand, or loved a character so much we cried when they died. Join a lively discussion on what makes us root for the underdog or love to hate the villain. Register here.


    **Please note that both workshops will take place on the 5th floor of the Central library.

    *Our program guide lists the location as Lower Level Meeting Room, but this area is closed due to ongoing flood recovery efforts.

    Heck, even if you don't plan on participating in NaNoWriMo these workshops are a great chance to sharpen up some skills and meet like-minded neighbours to bounce ideas off of. And because libraries are the ultimate place to write - the domestic distractions of home are eliminated, the calm-yet-lively atmosphere nurtures focus, and you surround yourself with all the glorious material you could ask for in terms of research and inspiration - we are hoping that any and all Calgary WRIMOTAURS come and plug in at any of our 18 branches across the city. Our doors will open 29 out of 30 days in November (closed for Remembrance Day) and on November 9th the Memorial Park Library is hosting two Write-In sessions.

    Register for 11AM - 1PM SESSION

    or

    Register for 2 - 4PM SESSION

    To learn more about Calgary's regional NaNoWriMo group, the Wrimotaurs, take a look at our 'Interview With A Wrimotaur' to hear it straight from our fearless leaders. Happy NaNo everybody!

    The Finishing Touches

    by Phil - 0 Comment(s)

    So you’ve successfully locked out your inner editor for an entire month to focus entirely on the production of pure, forward, relentless output. Whether you come out of National Novel Writing Month with 50,000 words or fifty, whether your rough draft needs a complete makeover or minor tweaking, the time will come to figure out what kind of structure the plot, characters, and settings you’ve created need in order to reach their absolute full to the brim potential.

    In most cases, unless you're William Faulkner, this is the hard part.

    Luckily, there is no shortage of places to turn to for help.

    Right here at the Central Library a group of aspiring writers meets once a month to share their work. While turning to family and friends for a critical read might result in some of the glorious praise you deserve, you'll benefit a lot more from a fresh set of critical eyes at our Creative Writing Club. Registration for the new season will begin December 17 and is limited to 40 participants.

    Unfortunately, the library's 2012 Writer-in-Residence season with Brian Brennan has ended, but watch out for Mr. Brennan at this year's Writers' Weekend, the library's annual day dedicated to aspiring Calgary writers, featuring free presentations all day long from local experts. Details remain tba on Writers' Weekend 2013 - I shouldn't even be talking about it - but I will say that it's happening February 2 and registration will begin December 17.

    Until the library's next Writer-in-Residence is announced, there are other residencies available:

    Deborah Willis will be in residence at the University of Calgary until June 15, 2013, through the Calgary Distinguished Writers Program.

    Lori Hahnel will begin a residency at the Alexandra Writers Centre Society in May 2013.

    The Alexandra Writers Centre Society also offers a wide range of writing courses year round, as well as a Manuscript Review Service.

    The list of resources available to Calgary writers seems to grow every day, and the more I search the more I find, so I certainly won't attempt to mention them all here now. But remember to take a break from the brain pounding work once in a while to enjoy the work of local authors making a difference in Calgary's literary scene, paving the way. I will do my best to pass along every exciting event I hear about, here at the Nook, and in the meantime please visit the upcoming events listing of two of Calgary's favorite literary venues:

    Pages Books on Kensington.

    Shelf Life Books.

    In terms of events, we might see a bit of downtime around the holiday season, which makes it the perfect time to check out some of our favorite, most useful of books for writers that landed on library shelves in 2012...

    Escaping into the Open, by Elizabeth Berg Wired for Story, by Lisa Cron Formatting & Submitting Your Manuscript (Writer's Digest)

    2013 Novel & Short Story Writer's Market

    Interview With A Wrimotaur

    by Phil - 0 Comment(s)

    It's a busy time for anyone involved in November's NaNoWriMo, especially the amazing volunteer Municipal Liaisons who work their tails off to create a special experience for writers in their region. MLs are veteran Wrimos who organize in-person meet-ups and parties, send out regular pep-filled emails, answer questions, and generally serve as the cheerleaders for the region and beyond. Here in Calgary we are lucky to have the leadership of two MLs: Naiya Azurewater and Xanateria.

    Click here for Calgary's regional website (www.calgarynano.ca).

    Xanateria recently took the time out of her busy schedule to enlighten us on the expansive, welcoming world of NaNoWriMo, in Calgary and beyond...

    _________

    WRITER’S NOOK: The basis of National Novel Writing Month seems straight-forward, to produce a short novel in the month of November with the support of hundreds of thousands of people, but in its thirteenth year NaNoWriMo has grown to become much more. Can you tell us why the project has been so successful?

    XANATERIA: One of the great things about NaNoWriMo is that it means so many different things to participants. But, the results are about more than just words on a page. As a municipal liaison, I’ve seen teens find the sheer joy of writing for pleasure, and develop a real love of the written word. The structure of NaNoWriMo allows many participants to finally let go of the idea that what they write must be perfect. Stripped of the ability to be their own worst critic, participants who honestly believe they aren’t creative at all get to experience the magic of telling their story. That can be a powerful mechanism for change. And that’s the biggest benefit of all, I think. Crossing the NaNoWriMo finish line is often a huge confidence boost. For a person who didn’t think they could manage 5000, managing 50,000 makes them ask, if I can do that, what else could I accomplish? And that confidence spills over to all areas of life, not just creative endeavors.

    WN: Last I checked there were 2,489 members signed up in the Calgary region, which seems like a strong response (even though Edmonton is beating us, per capita, yikes!). What can Calgarians look forward to by getting involved in their regional NaNoWriMo group?

    XT: Writing is often seen as a solitary undertaking. For NaNoWriMo Calgary, nothing could be further from the truth. We have a core group of die-hard regulars, with more enthusiastic newcomers every year. We welcome any person who wants to attend, regardless of the challenges they face. All our in-person events are held in venues accessible to people with disabilities, and you will never find participants who are more welcoming and friendly.

    The Office Of Letters and Light, the organization that runs NaNoWriMo, only requires us to host a Kick Off Event, a Thank Goodness It’s Over (TGIO) party, and one in person write-in per week.

    Due to demand from our members, we take things a bit farther. There’s Newcomers Night (held in October to help lessen panic and confusion for first-timers), a Midnight Kick-Off held on Halloween Night, a Midway Bash, 2 in-person write-ins per week, and a Marathon Write-In (at least 8 hours). For those who can’t make it to in-person events, there are also 2 virtual write-ins per week, held in the regional chat room.

    Needless to say, my co-municipal liaison and I don’t get a lot of sleep until after TGIO. But, even after that, our members enjoy our in-person events so much; we now meet once a month year-round. Our members have formed lasting friendships, even a few romances, but more importantly, we support each other every step of the way. For example, a few years ago, one of our members was already behind, and then lost a big chunk of work on the final day of the month. Upset and discouraged, he logged into chat to share that he had given up. His fellow Wrimotaurs lifted his flagging spirits and took turns cheering him on. He’d come to enough events that people knew how important finishing NaNo was to him. Those in the chat recruited each new arrival to help until he crossed the finish line a winner. Quite simply, they wouldn’t let him quit.

    The same is true at in-person events. Any time you are stuck in a scene, someone has ideas how to help you get out. If you are lacking motivation, someone will help you find more (and probably hand you caffeine).

    WN: Libraries are the ultimate place to write… The leisure and domestic distractions of home are eliminated, the calm-yet-lively atmosphere nurtures focus, and you surround yourself with all the glorious material you could ask for in terms of research and inspiration. Is there anything else about the library that makes it the perfect place for participants of NaNoWriMo?

    XT: It’s true that the library means you have fewer distractions and plenty of research material (though some of our participants would say researching is the ultimate distraction), there are a couple of other good reasons Wrimos write at the library. For one thing, like our participants, there are library branches all over the city. Branches are accessible, and come with friendly staff who can help you put your hands on the right material much faster than many of us can on our own. And unlike some other venues, libraries are filled to the brim with people who love the written word, so are much less likely to minimize, or even ridicule, your fantastic literary undertaking. As much as I love NaNo, I’ve seen how hard it can be when friends or family just don’t see the value in trying it. The library gives you another option to find a supportive environment.

    WN: What is the difference between a Wrimo and a Wrimotaur ?

    XT: Wrimo refers to any person, worldwide, who participates in NaNoWriMo. The regional group here in Calgary chose a mascot who is a cross between a writer and a Minotaur. So, our participants are known as the Calgary Wrimotaurs.

    WN: What do you have to say to stubborn, old-dog type of writers who are going to write their brains out all month long regardless of November and would rather not get distracted by the goal of a 50,000 word count? What will I miss out on?

    XT: Well, for one thing, you would lose the chance to meet the most dynamic group of writers I’ve ever been privileged to meet. But as one of their leaders, you might think I’m biased on that score. Seriously though, the true benefit of NaNoWriMo is not the 50,000 word goal. Rather, it’s the idea that in order to meet it, you must lock up your inner editor, put writing first (for at least the month), and put the words on the page. In fact, many of our Wrimotaurs set goals both below or far above the 50,000 mark. NaNo is a self challenge, so any number that challenges you personally would do just as well. We have some members who do a double NaNo, and pull off 100k, and others move up to triple and beyond. Others, who have multitudes of jobs, school, or children set their goal to 10k, or a half NaNo and are perfectly content with that.

    During NaNo, what you produce might not be literary gold, but the lack of pressure to be perfect can pave the way for higher productivity. Experts say it takes 30 days for an action to become a habit, so if you participate in NaNo you will hopefully have made writing every day a habit. Even if you plan to write all month, it can still be very difficult to make writing a priority in an already busy life. The magical thing about NaNoWriMo is that it gives you an easy way to explain why you have put writing ahead of all the other obligations. Granted, your friends might forget what you look like and your laundry pile might be mistaken for a mountain, but in the NaNo world, that’s considered normal.

    __________

    Xanateria (who also answers Josie or Josiah on Facebook) first attempted NaNo in 2005, but didn’t log her first win until 2006, when she discovered the hugely supportive community in Calgary. When she’s not helping pull NaNo together every year, she works as a home support worker for seniors and enjoys spending time online reading far too much fanfiction. For those of you who have yet to meet her, she is easy to pick out: just look for the mobility assistance service dog in the bright red harness next to her. Look as much as you want, but please don’t touch: Declan is adorable, we know, but he is working and needs to be left alone.

    National Novel Writing Month - Halfway There!

    by Phil - 0 Comment(s)

    While we like to think that every day this month has been a "NaNoWriMo day", we are now coming up on the midway mark and that means that the official 'NaNo Day at the Calgary Public Library' is coming up really quick. This Saturday, November 17th, the Central library offers two fantastic presentations from noon to three pm and there are still spots left in the eBook or Print? session from author and book promoter extraordinaire Susan M. Toy. She will be here at twelve noon to discuss the many changes in promotion and marketing that have occurred since the rise of eBooks and the new ways of delivering books to readers.

    If you've been to any of the library's Writer's Weekend seminars in the past you know there is no better person to get advice on the production, marketing, and promotion of your work than Susan Toy. If you haven't met Susan at any of our Writer's Weekends, go directly to this website:

    Susan M. Toy, Literary Consultant

    ...and then get yourself registered for one of the few remaining spots in Saturday's convergence of Calgary Wrimotaurs.

    HAPPY NANO DAY!


    CALGARY'S REGIONAL WEBSITE - www.calgarynano.ca

    Writing a Novel in Thirty Days

    by Janice - 0 Comment(s)

    So for all of you crazy, wonderful NaNoWriMo types:

    ...just how do you write 50,000 (or more) words in thirty days?

    We have lots of tips (books, blog posts, articles) on how to get ready for National Novel Writing Month madness, but once November 1 is here my advice is to stop looking at writing advice and start writing.

    Some types sneer at the concept of writing a full-length novel in one month, but the point of NaNoWriMo is not to end up with a beautifully written, perfect manuscript that will lead to publishers' bidding wars and international awards. No. My hope for all NaNoWriMo participants, whether already published or not, is simply to write 50,000 words—perhaps much of which will be complete and utter crap—by December 1.

    As I see it, the beauty in NaNoWriMo is threefold:

    1. Creating a regular writing practice
      So many of us struggle to write every day. During NaNoWriMo you write—a lot—every day, helping to create the habit of making the time to write and then actually writing.
    2. Completing a major length writing project
      Will it be your best work? No. Will it get published? Not likely. Will you realize that you can write a novel to completion and learn a whole lot (about yourself and you as a writer) from the process? Yes.
    3. Community Support
      What most consider the most important aspect of NaNoWriMo is the community support. There are websites, international and local online and in-person meet-up groups, support from others who see the fun and folly of writing 50,000 words in thirty days. (And perhaps you didn't realize that your local library is one of the best places for writing space, information, tips, support and awesome programs for writers?)

    So now what?


    Well, you (especially those of you who like to tackle things in a structured way) are in luck; in its How to write a book in 30 days series, the Guardian website has spent the last two weeks giving detailed advice and a day-to-day breakdown on how yoGuardian How to Write a Book in 30 Daysu might best use the thirty days of November:

    How to write a book in 30 days (Guardian series)

    Stage 1: days 1–6
    Creating your preliminary outline with characters, setting and plot

    Stage 2: days 7–13
    Researching your novel (note: please remember the Calgary Public Library)

    Stage 3: days 14–15
    The evolution of your story

    Stage 4: days 16–24
    Introducing the formatted outline

    Stage 5: days 25–28
    Evaluating the strength of your formatted outline

    Stage 6: days 29–30
    Revising your first draft

    If you like to take notes, there is even a series of worksheets to help keep you on track (you have to register for the Guardian website to access the worksheets).

    The information in this series is a condensed version of what is in Karen S. Wiesner's First Draft in 30 Days, and may help you focus on how best to use your time. (note to NaNoWriMo participants: you don't have time to read this book, or any book, before November 1.)

    •••••••••••••••••

    NaNoWriMo

    by Phil - 0 Comment(s)

    National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is a nonprofit event that encourages kids and adults to tackle the challenge of writing a novel in November. Launched in 1999, NaNoWriMo inspires its estimated 300,000 participants with email pep talks, a huge and supportive online community, and a host of web-based writing tools. Additionally, volunteers called Municipal Liaisons (MLs) in nearly 600 regions organize local writing events and get-togethers that transform novel-writing into an achievable and fun community endeavor.”

    Sign up today at the NaNoWriMo website.


    And because libraries are the ultimate place to write - the domestic distractions of home are eliminated, the calm-yet-lively atmosphere nurtures focus, and you surround yourself with all the glorious material you could ask for in terms of research and inspiration - we are hoping that any and all Calgary WRIMOS come and plug in at any of our 18 branches across the city. Our doors will open 29 out of 30 days in November (closed for Remembrance Day) and on the 17th the Central library is hosting a mid-way convergence featuring two special presentations you won't want to miss...



    CHARACTER CREATION WORKSHOP

    November 17. 1.00 - 3.00 pm.

    Join local authors Susan Calder (Deadly Fall) and Garry Ryan (Blackbirds) for an interactive workshop on making your characters come alive and about using E-Resources. Bring your questions and meet other writers. Everyone welcome. REGISTER.

    eBook or Print?

    November 17. 12.00 - 1.00 pm.

    Consider both formats when publishing your writing. Susan Toy discusses the many changes in promotion and marketing that have occurred as a result of both methods of delivering books to readers. REGISTER.

    __________________________________________


    This is also a perfect opportunity to make use of the library's Writer-in-Residence services. Book your manuscript consultation with Brian Brennan today and get some free, professional guidance on your journey to 50,000 words. Mr. Brennan's residency will end November 30 so do not wait.

    Five Days to 50,000 Words

    by Phil - 0 Comment(s)

    In the spirit of National Novel Writing Month, a spirit in which there is no room for revision, just pure forward progress, I write to remind that November is one of those months with only 30 days. That leaves only five days, counting today. If you haven’t started, that’s 10,000 words a day.

    Oh, but it’ll be worth it.

    Send the kids away.

    Call in sick to work, then un-plug the phone.

    And whatever you do, do not think about Christmas, unless you are writing about Christmas.

    If you’ve tried all these distraction-elimination tactics already and are still having trouble spewing out your novel, there is still one more really good option: go to the library! Our NaNoWriMo table on the fourth floor of the Central branch sits waiting for you to take over. It's a really good place to get lost in a literary daze and if you encounter a stubborn block that requires research you can put a librarian to work on it while you plot your next chapter. Go team!

    For more inspiration, if you're looking to diversify your cast of characters, the people-watching around this area of the city is tremendous.

    And the NaNoWriMo table happens to be right next to the 4th floor’s local history room, so if your novel takes place close to home, you’ll have the best resources to dive into Calgary and Alberta history and create stunningly authentic settings. If local history is part of your fictional world, don't go anywhere without getting into the library's Community Heritage and Family History blog. It will be a field of gems and shiny diamonds for you but you can still read it wearing just slippers or bare-foot.

    I know you'll be too busy writing to pick up any books on how to focus on writing, but if you did, this one looks perfect:Your brain at work: strategies for overcoming distraction, regaining focus, and working smarter all day long. Click the cover to link to the catalogue.

    NaNoWriMo

    - 1 Comment(s)

    While the month of November is normally reserved for Winter preparations, growing moustaches, and remembering the men and women who sacrificed their lives to preserve the freedom we are so blessed to enjoy, it is also, apparently, “National Novel Writing Month” - NaNoWriMo.

    If the Labour Day weekend’s 3-day novel contest is a bit daunting for you, maybe 30 days (or nineteen, if you’re just hearing about NaNoWriMo today) sounds a bit more reasonable and appealing. But there’s no winning novel here, it’s all about the personal output, and the goal is 50,000 words – approximately 175 pages. And it’s also all about NOT looking back on your work to make revisions – just put your head down and produce 50,000 words of your novel before December 1st.

    Distractions, obviously, won’t be welcome in the face of this challenge. That’s why libraries all over the world are setting up special tables for NaNoWriMo novelists. If you do get stuck, the world of library writerly resources, and friendly staff, will be right there to help.

    Look for Calgary’s NaNoWriMo table on the 4th floor at Central.

    To register go to http://www.nanowrimo.org/.

    By creating an account, you will be provided the "support, encouragement, and good old-fashioned kick in the pants you need to write the rough draft of your novel in November."

    By creating an account you’ll be able to:

    • Plan your novel.
    • Join a local group of writers and attend in person writing events.
    • Receive online encouragement from staff and published authors.
    • Access a worldwide community of writers in our online forums

    Remember that if you've already got plans this month, there are eleven other months in the year in which writers are always welcome to use any table in the library to work on their novels, whether it takes 30 days or 30 years.